background preloader

Her Code Got Humans on the Moon—And Invented Software Itself

Her Code Got Humans on the Moon—And Invented Software Itself
Margaret Hamilton wasn’t supposed to invent the modern concept of software and land men on the moon. It was 1960, not a time when women were encouraged to seek out high-powered technical work. Hamilton, a 24-year-old with an undergrad degree in mathematics, had gotten a job as a programmer at MIT, and the plan was for her to support her husband through his three-year stint at Harvard Law. After that, it would be her turn—she wanted a graduate degree in math. But the Apollo space program came along. And Hamilton stayed in the lab to lead an epic feat of engineering that would help change the future of what was humanly—and digitally—possible. As a working mother in the 1960s, Hamilton was unusual; but as a spaceship programmer, Hamilton was positively radical. “People used to say to me, ‘How can you leave your daughter? Then, as now, “the guys” dominated tech and engineering. ‘When I first got into it, nobody knew what it was that we were doing. Advertisement ‘That would never happen’

http://www.wired.com/2015/10/margaret-hamilton-nasa-apollo/

Related:  Space and NASATeach/ Ideasscience stuffpaivilyytinen

Top 20 Greatest Inventions of All Time Technology is a core component of the human experience. We have been creating tools to help us tame the physical world since the early days of our species. Any attempt to count down the most important technological inventions is certainly debatable, but here are some major advancements that should probably be on any such list (in chronological order): 1. Hacker says NASA is editing out UFOs from the videos before releasing them Meet Gary McKinnon who thinks that NASA is editing out the parts of UFO appearances in the videos it releases to the public and it has been doing so for years. He is a avid UFO watcher and has faced a 10-year fight against extradition to the US after breaking into computer databases of NASA, US military and the Pentagon. According to McKinnon, NASA and the US government has known for years we are being regularly monitored by UFOs from far-flung galaxies. But it believes that the general public wont be able handle the truth, or it would lead to the breakdown of religion and society and it has been successfully withheld the information by covering it up.

From field to fork: the six stages of wasting food Every second, an amount of food equal to the weight of a sedan car is thrown away in the US – about 60m tonnes a year. It starts at the farm. The potato that grew to the size of a brick. The watermelon with the brown slasher marks on the rind.

Universe's Ordinary Matter Detailed in New Study Dec 03, 2015 10:14 AM EST By Russell Westerholm, UniversityHerald Reporter (r.westerholm@universityherald.com) Whereas the universe is made up mostly of dark matter, which is only detectable when it interacts with other objects, another material ever-present is ordinary matter. Like Us on Facebook Teaching kids empathy: In Danish schools, it’s … well, it’s a piece of cake We all know what a Danish pastry is — that delightful caloric bomb of glazed breakfast deliciousness. But what about a Danish classroom cake? And moreover, how can this help teach empathy? While researching our book “The Danish Way of Parenting; What the Happiest People in the World Know About Raising Confident, Capable Kids,” my co-author and I interviewed numerous teachers and students across Denmark to learn how they incorporate empathy in schools and at home. Notably, in the Danish education system empathy is considered as important as teaching math and literature, and it is woven into the school’s curriculum from pre-school through high school.

Titan supercomputer helps researchers explore explosive star scenarios Exploding stars may seem like an unlikely yardstick for measuring the vast distances of space, but astronomers have been mapping the universe for decades using these stellar eruptions, called supernovas, with surprising accuracy. Type Ia supernovas—exploding white dwarf stars—are considered the most reliable distance markers for objects beyond our local group of galaxies. Because all Type Ia supernovas give off about the same amount of light, their distance can be inferred by the light intensity observed from Earth.

Keren Elazari: Hackers – The Internet’s Immune System ‘For the past three decades, hackers have done a lot of things, but they have also impacted civil liberties, innovation and Internet freedom, so I think it’s time we take a good look at how we choose to portray them, because if we keep expecting them to be the bad guys, how can they be the heroes too?’ The beauty of hackers, says cybersecurity expert Keren Elazari, is that they force us to evolve and improve. Yes, some hackers are bad guys, but many are working to fight government corruption and advocate for our rights.

A Year In Space Photos 2015: Pluto First Look, Water On Mars, EPIC View Of Earth And More Space exploration re-entered the public consciousness in a big way in 2015. From the box-office success of "The Martian" to the groundbreaking discoveries on Mars and elsewhere, space dominated the headlines several times this year. And the accompanying images were pretty dramatic. Here's just a small sampling of the many highlights of space photography in 2015. Water On Mars

Preschool To Prison Pipeline: Three Year Old Suspended 5 Times In One Year April V. Taylor As more and more people become aware of the mass incarceration epidemic that has seen America’s prison population grow to be the largest in the world, many are realizing how the school to prison pipeline is a contributing component that activists and politicians have both attempted to address. However, those tackling the issue may not be realizing just how young the school to prison pipeline starts. The Blob, but smaller: Tasmania's slime moulds - Off Track Slime moulds, long belittled as 'demon's droppings' and 'snake poo', are everywhere—and they're on the hunt for prey. What are they, though? A plant?

The Next Green Revolution For decades, environmentalists have warned of a coming climate crisis. Their alarms went unheeded, and last year we reaped an early harvest: a singularly ferocious hurricane season, record snowfall in New England, the worst-ever wildfires in Alaska, arctic glaciers at their lowest ebb in millennia, catastrophic drought in Brazil, devastating floods in India – portents of global warming's destructive potential. Green-minded activists failed to move the broader public not because they were wrong about the problems, but because the solutions they offered were unappealing to most people. They called for tightening belts and curbing appetites, turning down the thermostat and living lower on the food chain. They rejected technology, business, and prosperity in favor of returning to a simpler way of life.

Blue Origin re-flies New Shepard used on Nov. 2015 flight Jason Rhian January 22nd, 2016 Photo Credit: Blue Origin It has been less than two months since a Blue Origin New Shepard rocket lifted off, separated from the capsule that it carried, and carried out a controlled landing. Today, Friday, Jan. 22, 2016, that same booster has launched – and landed – again.

How to Develop Mindsets for Compassion and Caring in Students Early in his career Dr. Robert Brooks became the principal of a school in a locked-door unit at McLean Psychiatric Hospital. He and his staff of teachers worked with children and adolescents who were severely disturbed and whose behavior showed their turmoil. Within the first few months, Brooks felt demoralized and dreaded work each day.

Related: