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Arduino GCode Interpreter

Arduino GCode Interpreter
This page describes something which is no longer the most recent version. For the replacement version see: G-code This page has been flagged as containing duplicate material that Darwin/Arduino GCode Interpreter also attempts to cover.These pages should be merged such that both pages do not attempt to cover the duplicate topics. This page has now been superseded. For the up-to-date one, see here. Introduction G-Code is a commonly use language to control CNC machines. Several software packages can generate G-Code, so using this firmware allows you a degree of flexibility. Files The G-Code firmware source is available from SourceForge as part of the RepRap Arduino firmware package. Installation Once you download the proper files, there are a couple steps you need to do: Ubuntu users will also have to upgrade their avr-gcc; the standard one contains a bug. Usage Firmware Configuration We'll cover each of the variables below: This variable stores how many steps to take to move the X axis 1 inch. Bugs

http://reprap.org/wiki/Arduino_GCode_Interpreter

Related:  STL, G-code3d-printing

G-code G-code is the common name for the most widely used numerical control (NC) programming language, which has many implementations. Used mainly in automation, it is part of computer-aided engineering. G-code is sometimes called G programming language. Implementations[edit] The first implementation of high level numerical control programming language was developed at the MIT Servomechanisms Laboratory in the late 1950s. In the decades since, many implementations have been developed by many (commercial and noncommercial) organizations.

G-code This page tries to describe the flavour of G-codes that the RepRap firmwares use and how they work. The main target is additive fabrication using FFF/FDM processes. Codes for print head movements follow the NIST RS274NGC G-code standard, so RepRap firmwares are quite usable for CNC milling and similar applications, too. There are a few different ways to prepare GCode for a printer.

Wiki-Mozilla Firefox edit is restricted to the sysop group (set from the "protect" tab)move is restricted to the sysop group (set from the "protect" tab)read is restricted to the sysop group (set from the "protect" tab) About | Development | Community | RepRap Machines | Resources RepRap is humanity's first general-purpose self-replicating manufacturing machine. RepRap takes the form of a free desktop 3D printer capable of printing plastic objects. Since many parts of RepRap are made from plastic and RepRap prints those parts, RepRap self-replicates by making a kit of itself - a kit that anyone can assemble given time and materials. It also means that - if you've got a RepRap - you can print lots of useful stuff, and you can print another RepRap for a friend...

Micro Maestro 6-Channel USB Servo Controller (Assembled) The six-channel Micro Maestro raises the performance bar for serial servo controllers with features such as a native USB interface and internal scripting control. Whether you want high-performance servo control (0.25μs resolution with built-in speed and acceleration control) or a general I/O controller (e.g. to interface with a sensor or ESC via your USB port), this tiny, versatile device will deliver. The fully assembled version ships with header pins installed. Getting started with the Maestro Servo Controller Overview The Micro Maestro is the smallest of Pololu’s second-generation USB servo controllers.

GCODE Generators - ReplicatorG Generators are programs that take some sort of input file (STL, DXF, BMP, etc.) and transform it into machine specific code. Here are some good GCode generators: Free / Open Source GRBL Grbl is software for controlling the motion of machines that make things. If the maker movement was an industry, Grbl would be the industry standard. Most MakerBots and open source 3D printers have Grbl in their hearts. It has been adapted for use in hundreds of projects including laser cutters, automatic hand writers, hole drillers, graffiti painters and oddball drawing machines. Due to its performance, simplicity and frugal hardware requirements Grbl has grown into a little open source phenomenon.

Microcontroller circuit with copper tape Making a circuit with a microcontroller, battery, and LEDs connected by copper tape. Components (for more, see our electronic components page): Tools: Hot glue gun Soldering iron Programming the Microcontroller STL (file format) Example of STL vs CAD format STL (STereoLithography) is a file format native to the stereolithography CAD software created by 3D Systems. STL is also known as Standard Tessellation Language.[1] This file format is supported by many other software packages; it is widely used for rapid prototyping and computer-aided manufacturing. STL files describe only the surface geometry of a three-dimensional object without any representation of color, texture or other common CAD model attributes. The STL format specifies both ASCII and binary representations. Binary files are more common, since they are more compact.[2]

Closed Loop Control For 3D Printers One of the bigger problems with any CNC machine or 3D printer is the issue of missed steps when moving the toolhead. If a stepper motor misses a step, the entire layer of the print – and every layer thereafter – will be off by just a tiny bit. Miss a few more steps, and that print will eventually make its way into the garbage. [Misan] has the solution to this: closed loop control of DC motors for a 3D printer. Most printer firmwares use an open loop control system for moving their motors around.

New Arduino Mega CNC machine......(UPDATED) My new machine, the other one was a prototype, now this one will use all the electronics.... Made with MDF, bigger than the prototype...... Almost done... My new control box, X, Y, Z axis, DB9 conector for the limit switches, and usb conection to computer. Better cable arrangement..... Arduino: Dynamic Turning: Servo: Speed Freak Eye: Houston, we have a problem:Wiring Diagram If you've gotten this far you probably want some details about using a micro controller/ For this piece, the prototyping was done on an ARduino Duemilenove, the second largest and easiest Arduino to work with since connections to it are sockets you can plug wires into rather than having to solder them ON to. an Arduino MiniPro - the smallest of the Arduino micro controllers available at this time. So lets start with the parts and how they're wired together. The following diagram was done in a free software package called FRITZ. FRITZ makes creating What Connects To What a Drag and Drop process - that's quick and easy to learn - and use. That's in keeping with the whole Arduino Approach To Things - Learn By DOING rather than learn abstract concepts first, then apply them to something real. Start with playing with stuff - then - if you want, delve as deeply as you care to into the underlying theories / concepts.

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