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Conceptual Framework for Online Identity Roles

Conceptual Framework for Online Identity Roles
I just wrapped up a final project for an aesthetics course this semester, the assignment being to create a “Database of the Self.” I chose to make the database as a representation of the roles we play in terms of how we interact with information online. The roles are overlaid on a panarchy, which shows a visualization of adaptive lifecycles. Though the evolution of every idea or meme won’t necessarily follow this specific path, (it may in fact be rhizomatic, with multiple feedback loops), this begins to flesh out what we become as nodes within an enmeshed series of networks. The cycle can be thought to begin with the “Activators,” in the lower right side of image. For an interactive version of the graphic, click here. I found this to be an interesting exercise when thinking about the impact and influence we have on the web, and how information travels. Thanks to @wildcat2030 for inspiration from Friendships in Hyperconnectivity mindmap and to @gavinkeech for visual design. Like this: Related:  Digital Livejchaire

Artificial General Intelligence in Second Life  Virtual worlds are the golden path to achieving Artificial General Intelligence and positive Singularity, Dr Ben Goertzel’s, CEO of Novamente LLC and author of “The Hidden Pattern: A Patternist Philosophy of Mind” explained in his presentation “Artificial General Intelligence in Virtual Worlds” given at the Singularity Summit 2007 earlier this month. According to Goertzel, Singularity is no longer a far future idea. About a year ago Goertzel gave a talk “Ten Years to a Positive Singularity — If We Really, Really Try.” The slide that opens this post was in Goerzel’s presentation. It depicts an Archailect, Archai from the Orion’s Arm science-fiction world — a mega scale brain, “sophont or sophont cluster that has grown so vast as to become a god-like entity.” What is singularity? Harnessing the wisdom of crowds in the quintessential rapid prototyping environment for embodied virtual agents — Second Life – may well turn Artificial General Intelligence into an idea with traction.

20+ Tools to Create Your Own Infographics A picture is worth a thousand words – based on this, infographics would carry hundreds of thousands of words, yet if you let a reader choose between a full-length 1000-word article and an infographic that needs a few scroll-downs, they’d probably prefer absorbing information straight from the infographic. What’s not to like? Colored charts and illustrations deliver connections better than tables and figures and as users spend time looking back and forth the full infographic, they stay on the site longer. Plus, readers who like what they see are more likely to share visual guides more than articles. While not everyone can make infographics from scratch, there are tools available on the Web that will help you create your very own infographics. Read Also: The Infographic Revolution: Where Do We Go From Here? What About Me? “What About Me?” Vizualize.me Vizualize.me allows you to create an online resume format that is beautiful, relevant and fun, all with just one click. Piktochart easel.ly

The Architecture of Participation by Tim O'Reilly June 2004 I've come to use the term "the architecture of participation" to describe the nature of systems that are designed for user contribution. Larry Lessig's book, Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, which he characterizes as an extended meditation on Mitch Kapor's maxim, "architecture is politics", made the case that we need to pay attention to the architecture of systems if we want to understand their effects. I immediately thought of Kernighan and Pike's description of the Unix software tools philosophy referred to above. And of course, the Internet and the World Wide Web have this participatory architecture in spades. In addition, the IETF, the Internet standards process, has a great many similarities with an open source software project. The web, however, took the idea of participation to a new level, because it opened that participation not just to software developers but to all users of the system. Return to: tim.oreilly.com

EMERGENT CITIES - BuilderShips · ImagineNations 13 Community Role Archetypes (Which One Are You?) Decker and I had a blast putting this together – It’s a breakdown of some archetypical roles in community we’ve noticed over the years, along with the specific people in our community who fill those roles. More on this below. (Download a larger-font, editable version here) (Download a larger-font, editable version here) Assertion #1 – Everyone has essential gifts to bring to a community.Assertion #2 – Recognizing and Celebrating each person’s gifts is an essential aspect of Community Leadership. And, while the Art of Deeply Seeing people ultimately defies any nice neat categories we can come up with, these possibilities can definitely get your wheels turning. Question: What combination of these types do you see in yourself? You may look at these roles and be struck by how little of ANY of these roles are actually being filled by the people in your social circles. And once you’ve left your comment, check out our new training here: Authentic Community Leadership

Dirt Poster Dirt Poster is a Design and Graphic-Design work made by Roland Reiner Tiangco, a new graduate of a Design School, living in New York. While handling the poster, your hands starts to get dirty, and this dirt allows you to see what’s the poster is all about. Check out also the artist’s Website. Dirt Poster

32 Amazing Websites That Will Actually Save You Money Computer passes Turing test 9 June 2014Last updated at 08:36 ET Eugene Goostman simulates a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy A computer program called Eugene Goostman, which simulates a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy, is said to have passed the Turing test at an event organised by the University of Reading. The test investigates whether people can detect if they are talking to machines or humans. The experiment is based on Alan Turing's question-and-answer game Can Machines Think? No computer has passed the test before under these conditions, it is reported. The 65-year-old Turing Test is successfully passed if a computer is mistaken for a human more than 30% of the time during a series of five-minute keyboard conversations. On 7 June Eugene convinced 33% of the judges at the Royal Society in London that it was human. Man or machine? Other artificial intelligence (AI) systems also competed, including Cleverbot, Elbot and Ultra Hal. Transcripts of the conversations are currently unavailable, but may appear in a future academic paper.

Profiling practices In information science, profiling refers to the process of construction and application of profiles generated by computerized data analysis. The technical process of profiling can be separated in several steps: Data collection, preparation and mining all belong to the phase in which the profile is under construction. In order to clarify the nature of profiling technologies some crucial distinctions have to be made between different types of profiling practices, apart from the distinction between the construction and the application of profiles. Profiling technologies can be applied in a variety of different domains and for a variety of purposes. Knowledge about the behaviour and preferences of customers is of great interest to the commercial sector. In the financial sector, institutions use profiling technologies for fraud prevention and credit scoring. Profiles can be used against people when they end up in the hands of people who are not entitled to access or use them.

Trés intéressant, domage que se soit en anglais by actions_possibles_sur_le_web Apr 24

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