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This Graphic Explains 20 Cognitive Biases That Affect Your Decision-Making

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Related:  Conceptual Frameworks: Mind MappingPS6Fixed vs Growth MindsetNeuroscienceCritical Thinking

100 Reasons to Mind Map 100 examples of how you can use mindmapping whether completely new to mind maps or a seasoned pro. I hope the list helps generate ideas for you. 100 Reasons to Mind Map 1. Four questions that encourage growth mindset among students Teachers have long battled with how to get their students to become more resilient and improve their mindset. One popular theory, pioneered by Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford University, is the idea of growth mindset. Dweck explains that some students believe ability is malleable and can be improved (a growth mindset), while others think it is set in stone, probably decided at birth (a fixed mindset). Evidence suggests that those with a growth mindset seek out feedback on how to get better, persist with work for longer and cope better with change – all attitudes teachers want to develop in their young charges. How can teachers encourage a growth mindset?

Neuroscience explains why ISIS attracts psychopaths AFP/Welayat Homs/AFP - An Austrian Islamic State (IS) group fighter, identified as Mohamed Mahmoud (R) (aka Abu Usama al-Gharib), and his German comrade, named in the video as Abu Omar al-Alamani, speaking in German prior to executing two non-identified men The militant Islamist group known as ISIS is more than just an organization with an ideology that is different from our own. This is a group that has regularly carried out or inspired attacks that have massacred large numbers of innocent civilians in places like France, Turkey, Mali, and now, the United States.

How is Critical Thinking Different from Analytical or Lateral Thinking? Critical thinking as a term is often mentioned as a key skill for employees to have at all levels of the organization but many people do not fully understand it or confuse it with the related but different terms of analytical and lateral thinking. In this brief article let’s therefore look at what these latter two terms mean and then end on why critical thinking takes us further. So what is analytical thinking? Visual Thinking Evolution A mind map is a diagram used to represent words, ideas, tasks, or other items linked to and arranged around a central key word or idea. Especially in British English, the terms spidergram and spidergraph are more common,[1] but they can cause confusion with the term spider diagram used in mathematics and logic. Mind maps are used to generate, visualize, structure, and classify ideas, and as an aid to studying and organizing information, solving problems, making decisions, and writing. The elements of a given mind map are arranged intuitively according to the importance of the concepts, and are classified into groupings, branches, or areas, with the goal of representing semantic or other connections between portions of information. Mind maps may also aid recall of existing memories. By presenting ideas in a radial, graphical, non-linear manner, mind maps encourage a brainstorming approach to planning and organizational tasks.

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies In his new book, “How We Learn: The Surprising Truth about When, Where, and Why It Happens,” author Benedict Carey informs us that “most of our instincts about learning are misplaced, incomplete, or flat wrong” and “rooted more in superstition than in science.” That’s a disconcerting message, and hard to believe at first. But it’s also unexpectedly liberating, because Carey further explains that many things we think of as detractors from learning — like forgetting, distractions, interruptions or sleeping rather than hitting the books — aren’t necessarily bad after all. They can actually work in your favor, according to a body of research that offers surprising insights and simple, doable strategies for learning more effectively.

Best and Worst of Neuroscience and Neurology – November 2015 Maybe this is just a reflection of the annual funding cycle, but it is common to see a lot of high quality publications towards the end of year. And as the end of 2015 is approaching, choosing the most interesting articles for this review becomes a more challenging task. Here, I’m presenting only few of the studies that are worth talking about. As usual, the choice of article for inclusion mostly reflects my personal opinion about their significance. This month, scientific community marked the birthdays of two scientists: Charles Scott Sherrington and Edgar Adrian. Both Englishmen are best known for their shared Nobel Prize in Physiology received in 1932.

How Information Graphics Reveal Your Brain’s Blind Spots This story was co-published with Source. Visual Evidence Data and design in everyday life First comprehensive Tree of Life illustrates relationships between 2.3 million species In what's being called the "first real attempt to connect the dots and put it all together," this open-access project aims to link "all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history." How did life on Earth go from simple single-celled organisms to the incredibly complex human body? A number of attempts have been made to build an evolutionary 'tree of life' that connects the organisms on the planet, but until now, there has been no single comprehensive tree of life assembled. However, thanks to a multi-year grant from the U.S National Science Foundation, a collaborative effort from researchers at 11 institutions has produced an initial draft of this audacious project, which includes some 2.3 million species, called the Open Tree of Life.

The Science: The Growth Mindset - Mindset Works®: Student Motivation through a Growth Mindset, by Carol Dweck, Ph.D. Why the Growth Mindset? When students and educators have a growth mindset, they understand that intelligence can be developed. Students focus on improvement instead of worrying about how smart they are. Revolutionary Neuroscience Technique Slated for Human Clinical Trials A technique called optogenetics has transformed neuroscience during the past 10 years by allowing researchers to turn specific neurons on and off in experimental animals. By flipping these neural switches, it has provided clues about which brain pathways are involved in diseases like depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. “Optogenetics is not just a flash in the pan,” says neuroscientist Robert Gereau of Washington University in Saint Louis. “It allows us to do experiments that were not doable before.

A Taxonomy of Reflection: A Model for Critical Thinking My approach to staff development (and teaching) borrows from the thinking of Donald Finkel who believed that teaching should be thought of as “providing experience, provoking reflection.” He goes on to write, … to reflectively experience is to make connections within the details of the work of the problem, to see it through the lens of abstraction or theory, to generate one’s own questions about it, to take more active and conscious control over understanding. ~ From Teaching With Your Mouth Shut

Present Moment Awareness Mind Map If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! From the Spiritual Advancement Mind Map Set Bringing yourself back to the present moment The Buddha said “I teach one thing and one thing only: that is suffering and the end of suffering” Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved. However, in my work, I have found that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students. This article begins with a brief discussion about the difference between the two mindsets, what that means for education, and concludes with some ideas for how school leaders might seek to develop a growth mindset amongst their staff.

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