background preloader

Saudade

Saudade
Saudade (European Portuguese: [sɐwˈðaðɨ], Brazilian Portuguese: [sawˈdadi] or [sawˈdadʒi], Galician: [sawˈðaðe]; plural saudades)[1] is a Portuguese and Galician word that has no direct translation in English. It describes a deep emotional state of nostalgic or profound melancholic longing for an absent something or someone that one loves. Moreover, it often carries a repressed knowledge that the object of longing may never return.[2] A stronger form of saudade may be felt towards people and things whose whereabouts are unknown, such as a lost lover, or a family member who has gone missing. Saudade was once described as "the love that remains" after someone is gone. Saudade is the recollection of feelings, experiences, places or events that once brought excitement, pleasure, well-being, which now triggers the senses and makes one live again. In Brazil, the day of Saudade is officially celebrated on 30 January.[3][4] History[edit] Origins[edit] Definition[edit] Elements[edit] Music[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saudade

Related:  Understanding Human BehaviorBeing Humanmystique

The 8 Most Unexpected Advantages of Anxiety Anxiety can be crippling, but psychology studies find it does have some unexpected upsides. Anxiety can be crippling, but sometimes it is a crucial part of getting the best out of yourself. Artists, comedians, athletes and other performers often talk about the right amount of anxiety and how it can improve creativity and performance. What is Dakini’s Bliss? I was first introduced to the concept of Dakini’s Bliss in an article I read about Pema Chodron. There was an excerpt from Pema’s book “Taking the Leap” where she described a feeling of fear, terror even, and the resulting physical symptoms that accompanied it. She described anxiety, rawness, and a sense of not knowing what comes next, what my teacher Paula likes to call “free fall.”

The Present - Universal Truth - The Ultimate Truth A man should look for what is and not for what he thinks should be. Albert Einstein Truth you can check: It is as matter of fact as the ground and as useful as food. It's the kind of truth that can make hate and war as unnecessary as ignorance. What Mimicking One's Language Style May Mean About the Relationship Oct. 4, 2010 AUSTIN, Texas — People match each other's language styles more during happier periods of their relationship than at other times, according to new research from psychologists at The University of Texas at Austin. "When two people start a conversation, they usually begin talking alike within a matter of seconds," says James Pennebaker, psychology professor and co-author of the study. "This also happens when people read a book or watch a movie. As soon as the credits roll, they find themselves talking like the author or the central characters."

Colour my world Colour does not exist. Not out in the world at any rate. All that exists in the world is a smooth continuum of light of different wavelengths. Colour is a construction of our brains. A lot is known about how the brain does this, beginning with complicated circuits in the retina itself.

4 Surprising Advantages of Being Depressed Why being depressed can sometimes be necessary, even beneficial. Depression can be an adaptive way of dealing with certain problems in life, such as relationship breakdown and illness, say the authors of a new study. While clinical depression is a serious mental health issue, the researchers argue that by examining how depression might have originally arisen, we can better understand how to treat it. Dr. Paul Andrews, who led the study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, said: Rosenhan experiment Rosenhan's study was done in two parts. The first part involved the use of healthy associates or "pseudopatients" (three women and five men, including Rosenhan himself) who briefly feigned auditory hallucinations in an attempt to gain admission to 12 different psychiatric hospitals in five different states in various locations in the United States. All were admitted and diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. After admission, the pseudopatients acted normally and told staff that they felt fine and had no longer experienced any additional hallucinations. All were forced to admit to having a mental illness and agree to take antipsychotic drugs as a condition of their release.

Why you really should keep a journal, no matter how cheesy that sounds If you've spent any significant time reading books or articles on the "science of happiness", you'll have encountered what I've long thought of as the Cheesiness Problem. It's an inescapable fact that some of the most thoroughly evidence-backed techniques for enhancing one's mood are also the most excruciatingly embarrassing – the sorts of things that those of us who imagine ourselves to be rational, sceptical types would never dream of confessing to. This is awkward, since (as I've written before) it means having to choose between maintaining a pose of sardonic detachment or doing what actually works. For me, the most vivid example is keeping a gratitude journal. On the one hand, it really helps. On the other hand – well, come on.

Study traces neural wiring of a running mouse Cornell researchers have identified a group of spinal cord nerve cells that manages running in mice. In the process they have illuminated an interesting step in mouse evolution: When you're being chased by a hawk, you're better off scampering than galloping, even though galloping is faster. Described in the April 17 online issue of the journal Nature Communications, the research is part of an ongoing effort to learn more about locomotion in animals, essentially by creating a wiring diagram of the locomotor networks in the spinal cord, said Ronald Harris-Warrick, professor of neurobiology and behavior. Walking and running share common but overlapping processes in most animals.

The Ego and the Universe: Alan Watts on Becoming Who You Really Are by Maria Popova The cause of and cure for the illusion of separateness that keeps us from embracing the richness of life. During the 1950s and 1960s, British philosopher and writer Alan Watts began popularizing Eastern philosophy in the West, offering a wholly different perspective on inner wholeness in the age of anxiety and what it really means to live a life of purpose. We owe much of today’s mainstream adoption of practices like yoga and meditation to Watts’s influence. Alan Watts, early 1970s (Image courtesy of Everett Collection)

How To Turn Character Flaws Into Strengths With One Easy Mental Trick An easy mental trick to turn poor personality traits to your advantage. Believing that a negative personality trait has a positive ‘silver lining’ is enough to boost performance in that area, a new study finds. For example, a person who is very pessimistic might believe that one positive side of this ‘negative’ personality trait is that it makes them more realistic. The study, published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, found that those who mentally endorsed the idea that being impulsive was linked to greater creativity, were actually more creative on a subsequent test (Wesnousky et al., 2014). Alexandra Wesnousky, the study’s lead author, said:

Implicit Association Test It is well known that people don't always 'speak their minds', and it is suspected that people don't always 'know their minds'. Understanding such divergences is important to scientific psychology. This web site presents a method that demonstrates the conscious-unconscious divergences much more convincingly than has been possible with previous methods. This new method is called the Implicit Association Test, or IAT for short. In addition, this site contains various related information.

3 Ways to Remember Your Past Lives Edit Article1,198,361 views 77 Editors Edited 2 days ago Three Methods:Do It YourselfHypnotherapyBecome Metaphysical Have you been an astronaut?

Related: