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Arthrobots - Original steampunk insect sculptures by Tom Hardwidge

Arthrobots - Original steampunk insect sculptures by Tom Hardwidge
Related:  steampunk

A Visit to a Steampunked Home If you dropped by my house you'd probably be disappointed. Because (with the exception of my office, which is more post-apocalytic than anything else) it's simply not very steampunk. I do have plans, but none have come to fruition. However, a couple of weeks ago I was invited by Bruce Rosenbaum to visit his home in Sharon, Massachusetts and what I found there was just stunning! Bruce and Melanie Rosenbaum started ModVic (Modern Victorian) Home Restoration in June 2007 and have now moved onto steampunk Home Design. Bruce's home is a Craftsman style Victorian built in 1901. We'll start the tour in Bruce's kitchen with a lovely Victorian heater restored by David Erickson, a local craftsman and restorer of antique stoves who's workshop is just down the street from my own. Bruce designed and built the fire-back and hearth to compliment the stove and installed the back-lit stained glass windows to brighten the entire kitchen. Next to the stove (below) is a copper water heater tank.

SteamPunk Magazine Steampunk University What is Steampunk? | Steampunk.com This is a good question that is difficult to answer. To me, Steampunk has always been first and foremost a literary genre, or least a subgenre of science fiction and fantasy that includes social or technological aspects of the 19th century (the steam) usually with some deconstruction of, reimagining of, or rebellion against parts of it (the punk). Unfortunately, it is a poorly defined subgenre, with plenty of disagreement about what is and is not included. For example, steampunk stories may: Take place in the Victorian era but include advanced machines based on 19th century technology (e.g. “It’s sort of Victorian-industrial, but with more whimsy and fewer orphans.”- Caitlin Kittredge There are probably plenty of other combinations I’ve forgotten, but that’s steampunk as a genre in a nutshell. And it isn’t just written fiction anymore. “To me, it’s essentially the intersection of technology and romance.” – Jake von Slatt But steampunk has become a lot more. But wait, there’s more!

Typewriter Keys | Vintage Typewriter Key Sets-Lots Transforming vintage typewriter keys into jewelry is very popular these days. If you are a crafter or jewelry maker you know how well these unique bracelets, necklaces and tie tacks sell. You also know how difficult it can be to find old junk typewriters to keep up with the demand of your customers! Jewelry making takes time and searching for these old vintage machines can eat up entire days that could be better spent creating inventory. We've organized a fantastic selection of typewriter keys for you at huge savings! Most of these keys come in sets or lots and consist of the entire keypad of a particular typewriter. Underwood & Remington Keys w/ Green & Red Function Keys "Ebay offers the best selection of discount Vintage Typewriter Keys for your jewelry making needs!" Glass Keys Black Keys Keys w/ Stems Attached We've even organized some entire antique junk typewriters that you can purchase for even more savings! Glass Coated Keys

Miss Betsy's Steampunk Monitor If you visit the google library in these days, the librarian will find plenty of articles and depictions of so called "Steampunk Monitors". In my imagination though, I envisioned the creation of a device that could show static but also moving pictures generated by means of computation and modulation of waves generated by my ingenious new invention.... (Any resemblance to devices used in "City of Lost Children" is purely coincidental). I also wanted to add "loudspeakers" (E. Siemens et al.) to the device to present an even more pleasurable experience. The device will be able to reproduce sound and static/moving pictures and will be powered by another invention of mine , based on the works of my fellow researchers Nikola Tesla, using hyper-condensed steam applied to a turbine by the same name, Count Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Volta and Michail Osipovich Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, able to produce alternating current in the amount of 110 Volts.

The Steampunk Workshop | Technology & Romance - Fashion, Style, & Science Cheap and Easy to make Steampunk Keyboard After looking at some of the fancy retro keyboards at Datamancer's Site and the nice tutorial over at the Steampunk Workshop, I really wanted to make one myself. Unfortunately, I lack the tools/space and money to get and cut brass, and I'm not confidant enough to do so with any other metal. Also, I did not like the idea of spending $60+ for two sets of old typewriter keys. So I went looking for other ways to make one. It was at this point that I found stickers of old typewriter keys and realized another way I could make my keyboard "look" like it had old typewriter keys Thus I present a way to make a steampunk/typewriter looking keyboard for under $50 that the average person can easily make him/herself Tools Used: Screw Driver - both Philips and flat head will most likely be needed Dremel Tool - with plastic cutting blade Pliers - Needle nose work best for the finer cutting Small saw for cutting the scrap wood Materials Used: A Keyboard - DUH!

How Dieselpunk Works" Nostalgia can be powerful. It inspires daydreams, it can propel a politician into power and it may serve as the foundation for an entire artistic movement. That's the case with dieselpunk, which is both a subgenre of speculative fiction and an artistic style that roots itself in the aesthetics and technological sophistication of the past. Dieselpunk is similar to another movement called steampunk. But while steampunk draws its aesthetics from the Victorian era of the late 19th century, dieselpunk traces its roots to the early 20th century. In general, dieselpunk draws inspiration from the 1920s to the 1950s. Like steampunk, dieselpunk marries these trends of the past with the capabilities of today's technology. Connecting today's technology with yesterday's aesthetic requires a do-it-yourself attitude.

Steampunk The ultra technological world born from hackers & maker culture has helped inspire a Jules Verne themed steampunk bazaar full of brass computer accoutrements, leather fly-boy goggles, and ray-guns made from candle holders that should help equip you well enough to fight off an attack from a wayward Eastern Block airship, a corset wearing phantasm from yesteryear, or just your everyday future warriors who refuse to acknowledge that an imaginary life in the past is better than living in the reality of today, or dare I say, the curious gaze of tomorrow. The retro futuristic world of steampunk is thriving on Instructables, and with this guide, it can thrive in your life too. By request: My take on goggles.Often times after piloting my steam dirigible, I arrive at my destination only to find my eyelashes and eyebrows have collected a mass of gnats, fleas, and small birds. ... Well lets put it this way, ive always had this thing about traveling through time, and having a time machine.

Steampunk Finger Stylus I use a touchpad GPS regularly at work and lost the pen stylus a long time ago; it was inconvenient anyway trying to hold the stylus, GPS unit, and drive an ATV at the same time. So I made some finger stylussss?Stylii? Step 1: Cut Handle Out of Water Jug This is simple, just cut out a small section from the handle of the jug. Step 2: Plain Stylus Finish Briefly hold the tip of the stylus in a flame to round it and keep it from being scratchy. Step 3: Paint and Hot Glue Extra Stuff Getting a sense of Steampunk style takes a little intuition and internet browsing for ideas.

fairy Copper Plating & Etching Altoids Tins UPDATE: There's some great information on this page and it's comments, but I've recently published a far more comprehensive article here: Etching Tins with Salt Water and Electricity With this project I wanted to try a number of new things: Magazine pages as cheap toner transfer mediaCopper electroplatingEtching Altoid tins with a salt water solution The copper plating met with mixed success, but the other two methods resulted in some nice pieces. Note: blue vitriol and muriatic acid are archaic names for copper sulfate and hydrochloric acid. Magazine pages for toner transfer: While looking for information on transferring toner using a fuser assembly from an old laser printer I ran across several websites where people suggested using glossy magazine pages for transferring printed circuit board images to a copper substrate. Preparing the Altoids tins turned out to be harder then I predicted. Next we: Copper Plating Altoids Tins: From the picture below, this appears to work. Foom!

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