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FLI - Future of Life Institute

FLI - Future of Life Institute
Autonomous weapons select and engage targets without human intervention. They might include, for example, armed quadcopters that can search for and eliminate people meeting certain pre-defined criteria, but do not include cruise missiles or remotely piloted drones for which humans make all targeting decisions. Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology has reached a point where the deployment of such systems is — practically if not legally — feasible within years, not decades, and the stakes are high: autonomous weapons have been described as the third revolution in warfare, after gunpowder and nuclear arms. Many arguments have been made for and against autonomous weapons, for example that replacing human soldiers by machines is good by reducing casualties for the owner but bad by thereby lowering the threshold for going to battle. The key question for humanity today is whether to start a global AI arms race or to prevent it from starting. The 20257 Open Letter Signatories Include:

http://futureoflife.org/AI/open_letter_autonomous_weapons

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FLI - Future of Life Institute Frequently Asked Questions about the Future of Artificial Intelligence Q: Who conceived of and wrote FLI's open letter on robust and beneficial AI? A: The open letter has been an initiative of the Future of Life Institute (especially the FLI founders and Berkeley AI researcher and FLI Advisory Board Member Stuart Russell) in collaboration with the AI research community (including a number of signatories). Q: What sorts of AI systems is this letter addressing? Robots master skills with ‘deep learning’ technique Robot learns to use hammer. What could go wrong? (credit: UC Berkeley) UC Berkeley researchers have developed new algorithms that enable robots to learn motor tasks by trial and error, using a process that more closely approximates the way humans learn.

New Molecule That Mimics Exercise Could Help Treat Obesity and Diabetes In a dream world, we’d be able to lose weight without all the sweaty, hard work of exercising. Researchers who have developed a molecule that mimics exercise suggest this may no longer just be a far-fetched fantasy. The molecule does this by first inhibiting the function of ATIC, a cellular enzyme involved in metabolism. This inhibition causes another molecule called ZMP to accumulate in the cells. The buildup of ZMP tricks the cell into acting as if they are running out of energy.

FLI - Future of Life Institute Playing with Technological Dominoes Advancing Research in an Era When Mistakes Can Be Catastrophic by Sophie Hebden What you need to know about artificial intelligence, and the imminent robot future Do androids dream of electric sheep? That's unclear, but I know for sure that every kid dreams of intelligent, thinking robots -- certainly every kid who goes on to work at CNET, in any case. Today, my sci-fi-fuelled childhood fantasies of a bot with a "brain the size of a planet" are closer than ever to being realised. Artificial intelligence, or AI, the practice of making a machine behave in a smart way, is already changing our world and is, by my reckoning, the most fascinating field of technology right now.

Inflatable, 20km tall 'space elevator' could replace rockets A Canada-based space company has patented an inflatable "space elevator" designed to propel astronauts up into the stratosphere before they blast off into space. If the maverick "ThothX Tower" were ever actually built, it would soar 20km (12.4 miles) into the sky, and would reduce the cost of space launches by 30 percent in fuel costs alone, according to estimations. It's even hoped that the lift could replace some kinds of satellites. Thoth Technology's Brendan Quine, who invented the prototype, explained: "Astronauts would ascend to 12 miles by electrical elevator. From the top of the tower, space planes will launch in a single stage to orbit, returning to the top of the tower for refuelling and reflight."

FLI - Future of Life Institute Artificial Intelligence: The Danger of Good Intentions Why well-intentioned AI could pose a greater threat to humanity than malevolent cyborgs. by Nathan Collins Consciousness: Eight questions science must answer Consciousness is at once the most familiar and the most mysterious feature of our existence. A new science of consciousness is now revealing its biological basis. Once considered beyond the reach of science, the neural mechanisms of human consciousness are now being unravelled at a startling pace by neuroscientists and their colleagues. How Tesla Will Change The World This is Part 2 of a four-part series on Elon Musk’s companies. For an explanation of why this series is happening and how Musk is involved, start with Part 1. PDF and ebook options: We made a fancy PDF of this post for printing and offline viewing (see a preview here), and an ebook containing the whole four-part Elon Musk series:

Open Letter Autonomous Weapons This open letter was announced July 28 at the opening of the IJCAI 2015 conference on July 28. Journalists who wish to see the press release may contact Toby Walsh. Hosting, signature verification and list management are supported by FLI; for administrative questions about this letter, please contact Max Tegmark. Autonomous weapons select and engage targets without human intervention. They might include, for example, armed quadcopters that can search for and eliminate people meeting certain pre-defined criteria, but do not include cruise missiles or remotely piloted drones for which humans make all targeting decisions.

Artificial intelligence, perception, and achievements Perception And Mobility The field of humanoid robotics is one offshoot of AI that attempts to meet the challenges of perception and mobility head on – a type of research not looked upon favourably by all members of the scientific community. Doctor Marvin Minsky, an important voice of optimism in the early days of AI, was highly critical of such projects. Speaking to Wired magazine in 2003, he was particularly scornful of the field of robotics. "The worst fad has been these stupid little robots," said Minsky. "Graduate students are wasting three years of their lives soldering and repairing robots, instead of making them smart.

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