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How Does the Brain Retain Information?

How Does the Brain Retain Information?
Despite centuries of scientific research, the inner workings of the brain remain somewhat of an unsolved mystery — especially the study of memory retention and the process of learning. But theories certainly exist as to how these complex processes work. Here, we’ve distilled some of these ideas into an infographic that your brain can comprehend. >>More infographics on the Mindflash blog.>>Sign up for a free trial of Mindflash. (Click Image To Enlarge)

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Empahty Map Now it's time for the group to describe and note what Freddie's personal experience is (empathizing from his point of view) in each of the categories above. Remember, the context is very important; what he's seeing, hearing, thinking, doing, feeling and saying will be very different, depending on the situation (i.e. say, Freddie wants to sell more product). Spend about three minutes on each section, moving through the sections as a group. You can fill in each section using Post-it® notes or marker, asking: What is Freddie hearing?

MSNBC - How to Think About the Mind How to Think About the MindNeuroscience shows that the 'soul' is the activity of the brain Sept. 27 issue - Every evening our eyes tell us that the sun sets, while we know that, in fact, the Earth is turning us away from it. Astronomy taught us centuries ago that common sense is not a reliable guide to reality.

The Brain-Information about the Brain 1 Introduction “I think, therefore I am.” —René Descartes, 17th-century philosopher Few of us question the crucial importance of the brain. It is vital to our existence. Our brains enable us to think, as René Descartes so skillfully pointed out nearly 400 years ago. The Ten Most Revealing Psych Experiments Psychology is the study of the human mind and mental processes in relation to human behaviors - human nature. Due to its subject matter, psychology is not considered a 'hard' science, even though psychologists do experiment and publish their findings in respected journals. Some of the experiments psychologists have conducted over the years reveal things about the way we humans think and behave that we might not want to embrace, but which can at least help keep us humble. That's something. 1. 'Lord of the Flies': Social Identity Theory

Art of memory The art of memory (Latin: ars memoriae) is any of a number of a loosely associated mnemonic principles and techniques used to organize memory impressions, improve recall, and assist in the combination and 'invention' of ideas. An alternative and frequently used term is "Ars Memorativa" which is also often translated as "art of memory" although its more literal meaning is "Memorative Art". It is sometimes referred to as mnemotechnics.[1] It is an 'art' in the Aristotelian sense, which is to say a method or set of prescriptions that adds order and discipline to the pragmatic, natural activities of human beings.[2] It has existed as a recognized group of principles and techniques since at least as early as the middle of the first millennium BCE,[3] and was usually associated with training in rhetoric or logic, but variants of the art were employed in other contexts, particularly the religious and the magical. Origins and history[edit]

Pretty pictures: Can images stop data overload? 16 April 2012Last updated at 19:01 ET By Fiona Graham Technology of business reporter, BBC News Brain scan: Research suggests that one way to avoid being overloaded by data is by presenting it visually rather than text or numbers Sitting at your desk in the middle of the day, yet another email notification pops up in the corner of the screen, covering the figures you're trying to digest in the complicated spreadsheet in front of you. Your laptop is open on the desk next to you with another set of figures you need - meanwhile you're frantically tabbing through different documents on the main screen. You have a meeting in 20 minutes and you suddenly feel as if you're swimming in a sea of impenetrable data, and you're starting to sink.

8 Things Everybody Ought to Know About Concentrating “Music helps me concentrate,” Mike said to me glancing briefly over his shoulder. Mike was in his room writing a paper for his U.S. History class. On his desk next to his computer sat crunched Red Bulls, empty Gatorade bottles, some extra pocket change and scattered pieces of paper. In the pocket of his sweat pants rested a blaring iPod with a chord that dangled near the floor, almost touching against his Adidas sandals.

Elementary Matters: Ten Brain Based Learning Strategies If you have been reading my blog for a while, you know that I'm absolutely fascinated by the brain, and am particularly fascinated by the research that's been done to prove the best learning strategies. There's some great stuff out there! I read about the brain and learning daily, and just can't get enough. I've taught a few workshops about it, too. Even though I'm a second grade teacher, this stuff applies to all learners, from newborn babies to adult learners. 1.

100 Amazing Memory Hacks to Maximize Your Brain March 4th, 2010 Students, business professionals, and average Janes and Joes–just about everyone would love to have a fool-proof memory, and with these amazing memory hacks, you can. These suggestions, tools, and tricks are sure to have you using your brain to the best of its abilities, whether you need to remember a semester’s worth of Biology 101, keep finding yourself in the awkward spot of not remembering names, or anywhere in between. Remembering Names Never forget another name when you use these awesome memory hacks.

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