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Open Source Hardware Files

Open Source Hardware Files
Freeduino is a collaborative open-source project to replicate and publish Arduino-compatible hardware files. The Freeduino Eagle SCH, BRD and Gerber production files allow users to create boards that are 100% functionally, electrically and physically compatible with Arduino hardware. While Arduino is a protected trademark, Freeduino comes with a free and unrestricted license to use the Freeduino name, available for any use. This means you can do whatever you want with these files. The idea here is to make available the Eagle files you would need to make your own Freeduino variant board. Freeduino currently consists of a Diecimilia-equivalent schematic and 0603, 0805, 1206 and through-hole routed board files. Original Freeduino Files: Freeduino 0603 SMT prototype. Freeduino Serial (by NKC Electronics) Files: Freeduino MaxSerial Files: Freeduino SB (by HVW Tech/Solarbotics) Files: Note: Freeduino is not asociated with the official Arduino project.

http://www.freeduino.org/freeduino_open_designs.html

Related:  Arduino projectsmurorulo

11 Arduino projects that require major hacking skills—or a bit of insanity Raspberry Pi has received the lion's share of attention devoted to cheap, single-board computers in the past year. But long before the Pi was a gleam in its creators' eyes, there was the Arduino. Unveiled in 2005, Arduino boards don't have the CPU horsepower of a Raspberry Pi. They don't run a full PC operating system either. Arduino isn't obsolete, though—in fact, its plethora of connectivity options makes it the better choice for many electronics projects. Batman Batman is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics, as well as its associated media. The character was created by artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger, and first appeared in Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). Originally named "the Bat-Man," the character is also referred to by such epithets as "the Caped Crusader,"[5] "the Dark Knight,"[5] and "the World's Greatest Detective

Interfacing a sensor with an Arduino The world of hobby electronics is one that has seen explosive growth and massive changes over the past few years. The biggest changes have come from the level of computing hardware that is available to the hobbyist. From very simple microcontrollers to full PCs on a USB stick, all sorts of options are available. One of the more popular options is the Arduino, which falls between these two extremes. Alexander Graham Bell Alexander Graham Bell (March 3, 1847 – August 2, 1922)[4] was an eminent Scottish-born scientist, inventor, engineer and innovator who is credited with inventing the first practical telephone.[N 3] Bell's father, grandfather, and brother had all been associated with work on elocution and speech, and both his mother and wife were deaf, profoundly influencing Bell's life's work.[7] His research on hearing and speech further led him to experiment with hearing devices which eventually culminated in Bell being awarded the first U.S. patent for the telephone in 1876.[N 4] Bell considered his most famous invention an intrusion on his real work as a scientist and refused to have a telephone in his study.[9][N 5] Many other inventions marked Bell's later life, including groundbreaking work in optical telecommunications, hydrofoils and aeronautics. In 1888, Bell became one of the founding members of the National Geographic Society.[11]

How to build a 5$ Arduino (clone) If you are like me and build projects with Arduino, you must have felt the frustration with ripping your project apart, because you wanted to build something else with that Arduino. I have had the same issue many times, so I decided to find a way to solve this once and for all. Hence, how to build an Arduino clone for less than 5$. Warning: Now before we continue a warning. This post explains how to build Arduino cones for less than 5$, but it will mean that you either get creative with you current Arduino to program the Arduino bootloader, or you invest a bit in a standalone ISP programmer and a FTDI interface board (total about 20$ one time investment). Arduino Powered Remote Control Lawnmower We’ve seen loads of great Arduino projects and even a few RC lawn mowers, but we’ve never seen the two combined until now. Â This project walks you through the entire build process step by step and includes a thorough guide for creating remote control robotics. You can read the entire build tutorial to perhaps create your own robotic servant. Â Now all you need is a hammock to relax in while your new robot mows the grass for you Automate your Chores:

Photophone This article is about Alexander Graham Bell and Sumner Tainter's optical phone. For the sound-on-film technology, see RCA Photophone. A historical plaque on the side of the Franklin School in Washington, D.C. which marks one of the points from which the photophone was demonstrated A diagram from one of Bell's 1880 papers Water Tank Depth Sensor Water is a precious resource in many parts of the world, and many people rely on water tanks to supplement their water supply by storing collected rainwater or water pumped from a well or bore. But how do you measure how full a tank is? Tanks are constructed of opaque material to prevent algae growth and often kept closed up to prevent mosquito infestation or access by small rodents so it's inconvenient to physically look inside.

Laser safety Laser safety is safe design, use and implementation of lasers to minimize the risk of laser accidents, especially those involving eye injuries. Since even relatively small amounts of laser light can lead to permanent eye injuries, the sale and usage of lasers is typically subject to government regulations. Moderate and high-power lasers are potentially hazardous because they can burn the retina of the eye, or even the skin. To control the risk of injury, various specifications, for example ANSI Z136 in the US and IEC 60825 internationally, define "classes" of laser depending on their power and wavelength. These regulations also prescribe required safety measures, such as labeling lasers with specific warnings, and wearing laser safety goggles when operating lasers.

Freeboard [MeshCMS] FreeBoard is a new way to provide navigation instruments on your boat. Its released as an open source project (GPL). Its in an early but useable stage, and developing fast. Code is on , NEW: protoype interface board arrives This is the 'floating' view. Automotive lighting The lighting system of a motor vehicle consists of lighting and signalling devices mounted or integrated to various parts of a motor vehicle. These may include the front, sides, rear and, in some cases, the top of the vehicle. The purpose of this system is to provide illumination for the driver.

Homebuilt Rovs I have completed the first pressure test....... I began the pressure test by slowly increasing the water pressure while watching for any signs of leaks, I was able to reach my maximum water pressure of 95 psi (which simulates a depth of around 200') without either of the seals showing any signs of leaks. The only leak a had was from the actual wires, and this was through the jacket of the wires and not the rubber exit seal. I could however get the rubber wire exit seal to leak a little (and by little I mean a small trickle) if I pulled the wires sharply to the side, which would be expected because I was creating a void in the seal. Keep in mind that this was the back side (dry end) of the seal though and that shouldn't happen on wet side of the seal because that side does have some flexibility to it.

Ubiquitous computing Ubiquitous computing (ubicomp) is a concept in software engineering and computer science where computing is made to appear everywhere and anywhere. In contrast to desktop computing, ubiquitous computing can occur using any device, in any location, and in any format. A user interacts with the computer, which can exist in many different forms, including laptop computers, tablets and terminals in everyday objects such as a fridge or a pair of glasses. The underlying technologies to support ubiquitous computing include Internet, advanced middleware, operating system, mobile code, sensors, microprocessors, new I/O and user interfaces, networks, mobile protocols, location and positioning and new materials. This new paradigm is also described as pervasive computing, ambient intelligence,[1] ambient media[2] or 'everyware'.[3] Each term emphasizes slightly different aspects. Core concepts[edit]

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