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DataVis.ca

DataVis.ca
Related:  LabsVisual Literacy

Gallery of Data Visualization - Introducton This Gallery of Data Visualization displays some examples of the Best and Worst of Statistical Graphics, with the view that the contrast may be useful, inform current practice, and provide some pointers to both historical and current work. We go from what is arguably the best statistical graphic ever drawn, to the current record-holder for the worst. Like good writing, good graphical displays of data communicate ideas with clarity, precision, and efficiency. Like poor writing, bad graphical displays distort or obscure the data, make it harder to understand or compare, or otherwise thwart the communicative effect which the graph should convey. [See the Bad Writing Contest for examples of The Best of Bad Writing. Do you know of other examples of the Best or Worst in Statistical Graphics on the Web? These pages are organized as a collection of images, along with a few of the 1000 words each may be worth and some links to original sources.

Francesco Franchi Institute: Visualisierungsinstitut der Universität Stuttgart The Visualization Research Center (VISUS) is a central institution of the University of Stuttgart. About 30 scientists research in different areas of Scientific Visualization, Visual Analytics, Visual Computing and Computer Graphics, as well as interdisciplinary, applied research. The latter results in a very close co-operation with non-visualization disciplines of the University of Stuttgart. As part of the Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems (VIS), the insitute is embedded into the Faculty of Computer Science, Electrical Engineering and Information Technology. Teaching program of VIS

Visual Thinking Home » All CFT Teaching Guides » Visual Thinking by CFT graduate program coordinator Maria Ebner & assistant director Derek Bruff Introduction Our brains are wired to rapidly make sense of and remember visual input. Below you’ll find resources for integrating visual thinking in your teaching. On March 17, 2010, the CFT hosted a workshop on this topic. For more notes from the workshop, as well as ideas participants generated during the workshop, see the bottom of this page. Images as Metaphors Presentation Zen: Garr Reynolds, author of Presentation Zen, maintains a blog in which he writes about effective presenting. Flickr: A great source for free, high-quality images is Flickr, the photo-sharing site. Images as Stories Digital Storytelling: See the University of Houston’s Educational Uses of Digital Storytelling site for an introduction to digital storytelling, examples of digital stories, and resources for getting started. Schematic Diagrams Data Visualizations More Resources

The Three Elements of Successful Data Visualizations - Jim Stikeleather by Jim Stikeleather | 8:00 AM April 19, 2013 Now that we’ve discussed when data visualization works — and when it doesn’t, let’s delve into what makes a successful data visualization. Although there are a number of criteria, including ease of comprehension and aesthetics, I’d like to explore the three that designers most often overlook. 1. It understands the audience. Before you throw up (pun intended) data in your visualization, start with the goal, which is to convey great quantities of information in a format that is easily assimilated by the consumers of this information — decision-makers. Who is the audience, and how will it read and interpret the information? 2. Lines and bars are simple, schematic geometric figures that are an integral component of many kinds of visualizations: lines connect, suggesting a relationship. There is one other element to the framework: Before everything else, make sure your data is clean and you understand its nuances. 3.

Gallery of Data Visualization - Historical Milestones Florence Nightingale's Coxcomb diagrams Coxcomb, original (537x462) [37K] || SAS re-creation (486x501) [5K] Florence Nightingale (portrait [41k]) is remembered as the mother of modern nursing. But few realize that her place in history is at least partly linked to her use, following William Farr, Playfair and others, of graphical methods to convey complex statistical information dramatically to a broad audience. After witnessing deplorable sanitary conditions in the Crimea, she wrote Notes on Matters Affecting the Health, Efficiency and Hospital Administration of the British Army. (1858), an influencial text including several graphs which she called "Coxcombs". Aside from its historical interest, Nightingale's Coxcomb is notable for its display of frequency by area, like the pie chart. An example of "Stigler's Law of Eponomy" (Stigler, 1980), Nightingale's Coxcomb chart did not orignate with her, though this should not detract from her credit.

Natural Earth The Use of Data Visualization in Government Monday, June 10th, 2013 - 10:26 The concept of visualization recalls a pivotal scene in the movie A Beautiful Mind which showed the protagonist, mathematician John Nash, looking at an expansive table of numbers. Slowly, certain numbers seemed to glow, suggesting that Nash was perceiving a pattern among them, though no other researcher had been able to draw any meaning from the table. For most people, however, a table of numbers is not intrinsically meaningful. Think of the most prosaic example: a spreadsheet. The best visualizations help viewers understand not only the data, but also their implications. In addition to these many examples of visualizations, the report discusses the history of this technique, and describes tools that can be used to create visualizations from many different kinds of data sets. The report presents case studies on how visualization techniques are now being used by two local governments, one state government,and three federal government agencies.

Organizers Graphic organizer, concept mapping, and mind mapping examples. Graphic organizers can take many forms as per the table lower down. Graphic organizers can help motivate, increase recall, assist understanding, create interest, combat boredom and organize thoughts. Some more forms: Clock, Cluster/Word Web, Describing Wheel, E-Chart, Fact and Opinion, Five W's Chart, Flow Chart, Four-Column Chart, Garden Gate, Goal-Reasons Web, Hierarchy chart, Ice-Cream Cone, Idea Rake, Idea Wheel, , Inverted Triangle, ISP Chart, KWHL Chart, KWL Chart, KWS Chart, Ladder, Observation Chart, Persuasion Map, Planning Chart, Problem Solution Chart, Progress Report, Sandwich, Sense Chart, Sequence Chart, Spider Map, Step-by-Step Chart, Story Map 1, T-Chart, Think-Pair-Share, Ticktacktoe, Time Line, Time-Order Chart, Tree Chart, Venn Diagram. Graphic organizers are valuable tools for teaching/instruction. Free Graphic Organizers | PC Tricks | Concept |

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