background preloader

Coding in the Classroom: 16 Top Resources

Coding in the Classroom: 16 Top Resources
As cool as technology is, its intricacies and inner workings are sometimes intimidating, especially for young people who may be more interested in what technology can do for them rather than what they can do with technology. However, when students hurdle that obstacle and see the value of computer science — specifically coding — they gain a broadened perspective and the potential for a rewarding career in the tech field. The following resources will help you teach your students the basics of coding and will provide tips on how to keep kids interested as you go. Tools to Use in Class Can you make coding fun for your students? Absolutely! Edutopia presents a list of six resources designed to help parents get their kids interested in coding. The Facts About Coding Teaching your students to code is important, but teaching them its practical value is also key in helping them derive the most benefit from what they learn. Dr.

http://www.edudemic.com/coding-classroom-16-top-resources/

Related:  ResourcesProgramaciónCoding for Kidskodning2Coding Resources

Learn Minecraft Hour of Code Grades 2+ | Blocks Moana: Wayfinding with Code Make a Flappy game Star Wars: Building a Galaxy with Code Grades 2+ | Blocks, JavaScript Learn To Code, Learn To Think : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture Is learning to code software a valuable skill? Is it one that prepares people to join the workforce of the future? On the one hand, the popularity of computer science as a college major and the proliferation of coding bootcamps suggest the answer is decidedly "yes." Code.org, a non-profit that encourages education and diversity in computer science, currently invites visitors to its homepage to join over a million others in agreeing with the following statement: "Every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science"

Some Very Good Resources to Help Students Learn Coding December , 2015 When you want to write a story, you need to understand grammar. When you want to cook a meal, you need to understand ingredients. When you want to build technology, you need to understand programming. Here are some resources to help students learn how to program. ScratchJr Best Free Ways to Learn Programming I can remember back when I was young how alien a couple of lines of code that were published in a kid's magazine looked to me. Some twenty years later (or should I better say a year ago), I decided that I should teach myself how to create some small and usable programs. Sad to say, I lost interest shortly after. Well, this year I tried again. This time I installed a different programming language, downloaded some tutorials from Youtube and I also borrowed some books on programming from my local library.

View Materials These short, hour-long activities allow you to try out CS First and introduce your students to computer science without committing to a complete 8-activity theme. They're perfect for special events such as Hour of Code or CSEdWeek, or as practice to help you familiarize yourself with CS First before starting a normal theme. Gumball's Coding Adventure

Google partners with Udacity to offer Nanodegree in Android development Google has launched a new effort, in partnership with online learning service Udacity, to help developers become more skilled and capable at developing for the Android platform. The company has created a new credential called a Nanodegree based on a curriculum designed to take 9 to 12 months to complete. The coursework can be completed on your own schedule, but Google suggests at least 10 hours per week be devoted to the effort. The fee is $200 per month although a one week free trial is currently being offered as part of the launch. In addition to the traditional coursework, students will be engaged in several projects to produce actual apps, add features and capabilities, prepare them for production, and implement Material design concepts. Skills in these areas will be developed using several sample apps that students will build during the course.

Computing Corner With the new changes to the ICT curriculum in England for 2014, I decided to collate all the Computing links that I can in this one handy space. Suggestions welcome. Excellent guide to new Computing Curriculum from NAACE and CAS written by Miles Berry (@MBerry) Amazing Book by @SimonHaughton (Very good for adults too! 24 Unique Maker Education Resources For Teaching & Learning 24 Unique Maker Education Resources For Teaching & Learning by Mike Acedo 1. Makezine.com is a major hub for the maker’s movement, providing amateur makers and educators with a plethora of information, resources, and project ideas to implement for themselves, or in their classrooms. 2. This UK based tech company seeks to provide children of all ages and backgrounds with cheap, quality computers in hopes of educating kids in computer programming.

Startup Has a Clever Tool to Get Non-Techies to Code: Excel Paul Katsen worked at a consulting firm, and he was in charge of analytics. This meant his colleagues would ask him to write scripts that could gather data across the workforce and beyond. In the beginning, he tried to teach his coworkers how to use the tools he had built, but he eventually realized they weren’t all that interested in learning anything close to programming skills. Europe Code Week 2015 - Resources and guides EU Code Week is a grass-root movement run by volunteers who promote coding in their countries as Code Week Ambassadors. Anyone – schools, teachers, libraries, code clubs, businesses, public authorities – can organise a #CodeEU event and add it to the codeweek.eu map. To make organising and running coding events easier, we have prepared different toolkits and selected some of the best lesson plans, guides and other resources.

Here's the one thing everyone learning to code should do, no matter what When learning a new programming language (maybe even your first!), you’re going to have feelings of dread and despair. At some point, you won’t understand what’s going on with anything, and everything will make you want to flip your desk over and quit. You can make it easier on yourself by doing one key thing: take notes. Lots of notes. All the time, every time.

Related: