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Do You have the Personality To Be an Inquiry-Based Teacher?

Do You have the Personality To Be an Inquiry-Based Teacher?
By Thom Markham So far, the challenges of transforming education into a system capable of inspiring students to become skillful, creative, knowledgeable problem-solvers fall into familiar territory: What types of curriculum, standards, skills, strategies, and adaptations to classroom teaching methods will be necessary to do this? But it’s likely these will prove to be secondary questions. As education crosses the divide between a transmission model and an inquiry model, a more pressing issue will be apparent: How do we identify, attract, nurture, and train teachers who have an “inquiry-friendly” personality? The issue already is in view. When a teacher comes out from behind the lectern, leaves the front of the room, kneels beside a student to coach them through a problem, offers feedback designed to promote confidence and perseverance, and becomes a true partner in the learning process, the relationship between teacher and student automatically shifts. These are trainable skills.

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/11/21/do-you-have-the-personality-to-be-an-inquiry-based-teacher/

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Reinventing School From the Ground Up For Inquiry Learning By Thom Markham A grave miscalculation exists in the minds of many educators: That inquiry-based learning, project based learning, and 21st century competencies can flourish in industrial model schools. Under this world view, the inquiry goals of the Common Core State Standards are “strategies” to be added to the existing list of classroom techniques, while skills like collaboration, communication, or creativity can be taught despite 43-minute periods, desks in rows, and pacing guides set in stone. In other words, reaching the top of Bloom’s Taxonomy is important, but less so than maintaining regimental order. But what we know—from industry and neuroscience—is that organizational structure, environment, and human performance are deeply intertwined.

Teaching Information Literacy Now Last week, a new study from Stanford University revealed that many students are inept at discerning fact from opinion when reading articles online. The report, combined with the spike in fake and misleading news during the 2016 election, has school librarians, including me, rethinking how we teach evaluation of online sources to our students. How can we educate our students to evaluate the information they find online when so many adults are sharing inaccurate articles on social media? Digital Formative Assessments! options to use during a lesson cycle to assess learning Digital Formative Assessment: Tools for Teachers Birdville ISD embraces the PLC cycle and encourages teachers to constantly monitor, assess, and re-teach. Formative assessment is the key to understanding what students have learned, and teachers need a variety of formative assessment tools in their teaching tool-kit to do this well. There are numerous digital formative options, all with different classroom uses and functions.

Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? “Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind,” said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school, and enumerated some of these ideas at SXSWEdu last week. 1. BE FLEXIBLE. The less educators try to control what kids learn, the more students’ voices will be heard and, eventually, their ability to drive their own learning.

Evaluating Websites - AndySpinks.com C.A.R.S. Checklist for Evaluating Internet Sources You should evaluate every website you use for research or for personal information. Ask yourself the following questions about each site and try to use only those that have the best evidence of credibility, accuracy, reasonableness, and support. Download a Printable Version (PDF) Should we focus on teaching or learning? – What Ed Said “Inquiry happens when you focus on the art of teaching.” Kath Murdoch. This is an interesting moment in Kath’s conversation with teachers. Genius Hour - Scaffolding for those who can't settle - The 6L Team- So introducing Genius Hour has been an absolute hit in my class. The kids are getting right into it! The level of flow and collaboration in the classroom is simply amazing! However, Genius Hour has been a bit messy in the first few sessions (I've read that this is to be expected!).

Researchers find students have trouble judging the credibility of information online Education scholars say youth are duped by sponsored content and don't always recognize political bias of social messages. When it comes to evaluating information that flows across social channels or pops up in a Google search, young and otherwise digital-savvy students can easily be duped, finds a new report from researchers at Stanford Graduate School of Education. The report, released this week by the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG), shows a dismaying inability by students to reason about information they see on the Internet, the authors said. Students, for example, had a hard time distinguishing advertisements from news articles or identifying where information came from. "Many people assume that because young people are fluent in social media they are equally perceptive about what they find there," said Professor Sam Wineburg, the lead author of the report and founder of SHEG. "Our work shows the opposite to be true."

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