background preloader

Why can’t we read anymore?

Why can’t we read anymore?
Spending time with friends, or family, I often feel a soul-deep throb coming from that perfectly engineered wafer of stainless steel and glass and rare earth metals in my pocket. Touch me. Look at me. You might find something marvellous. This sickness is not limited to when I am trying to read, or once-in-a-lifetime events with my daughter. At work, my concentration is constantly broken: finishing writing an article (this one, actually), answering that client’s request, reviewing and commenting on the new designs, cleaning up the copy on the About page. All these tasks critical to my livelihood, get bumped more often than I should admit by a quick look at Twitter (for work), or Facebook (also for work), or an article about Mandelbrot sets (which, just this minute, I read). Dopamine and digital It turns out that digital devices and software are finely tuned to train us to pay attention to them, no matter what else we should be doing. How can books compete? Pleasing ourselves to death

https://medium.com/@hughmcguire/why-can-t-we-read-anymore-503c38c131fe

Related:  robynyvonneIs Google Making Us Stupid?ICCClassroom

30 Google Drive Tips You Can't Afford to Miss Click To View Slideshow» Google's online office suite and storage service has come a long way, becoming the tool of choice for many. Here's a list of tips and tricks to squeeze the best out of Drive.

Could This Be The Most Upworthy Site In The History Of The Internet? Hi, we're Upworthy, a new social media outfit with a mission: to help people find important content that is as fun to share as a FAIL video of some idiot surfing off his roof. Let's be honest: The Internet's been overrun with inanity, and all of us are eating it up. For example, here's a scientific study we commissioned about what comprises the online world: We can't change all that. But we believe the things that matter in the world don't have to be boring and guilt-inducing. And the addictive stuff we love doesn't have to be completely substanceless. The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens In a viral YouTube video from October 2011 a one-year-old girl sweeps her fingers across an iPad's touchscreen, shuffling groups of icons. In the following scenes she appears to pinch, swipe and prod the pages of paper magazines as though they too were screens. When nothing happens, she pushes against her leg, confirming that her finger works just fine—or so a title card would have us believe. The girl's father, Jean-Louis Constanza, presents "A Magazine Is an iPad That Does Not Work" as naturalistic observation—a Jane Goodall among the chimps moment—that reveals a generational transition. "Technology codes our minds," he writes in the video's description. "Magazines are now useless and impossible to understand, for digital natives"—that is, for people who have been interacting with digital technologies from a very early age.

History vs…: a TED-Ed Lesson playlist “History has remembered the kings and warriors, because they destroyed; art has remembered the people, because they created,” wrote William Morris. To learn how 7 notorious leaders are remembered by history, watch the TED-Ed Lessons below: 1. History vs. Richard Nixon A reminder that your Instagram photos aren’t really yours: Someone else can sell them for $90,000 Richard Prince’s Instagram screenshots at Frieze Art Fair in New York. (Marco Scozzaro/Frieze) The Internet is the place where nothing goes to die. Those embarrassing photos of your high school dance you marked “private” on Facebook? The drunk Instagram posts? The NSFW snapchats?

Online Personalization Creates Echo Chamber to Affirm Biases ON the Web, we often see what we like, and like what we see. Whether we know it or not, the Internet creates personalized e-comfort zones for each one of us. Naomi Baron's Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World Readers have been dreading the rise of e-books since before the technology even existed. A 1991 New York Times piece predicting the imminent invention of the personal e-reader spurred angry and impassioned letters to the editor. One reader wrote in to express his worry that the new electronic books wouldn't work in the bath. Twenty-three years later, half of American adults own an e-reading device. A few years ago, Obama set a goal of getting e-textbooks into every classroom by 2017.

The Lecture: A Cultural Construction of Privilege? – MICHELLE PACANSKY-BROCK It’s been quite awhile since I’ve read an article that has inspired me to write a post on a Sunday afternoon. But today, I saw a link to an article in my Nuzzel feed titled “Is the lecture unfair?” and it piqued my interest. This recent article from the New York Times discusses findings from recent studies that show how lectures privilege students who come from privileged backgrounds. The author, Annie Murphy Paul, explains, “…a growing body of evidence suggests that the lecture is not generic or neutral, but a specific cultural form that favors some people while discriminating against others, including women, minorities and low-income and first-generation college students. Creative Commons What is Creative Commons? The short animations below are a fun and simple way to learn about Creative Commons. Both were developed by Creative Commons Australia and are based on the kooky characters, Mayer and Bettle.

Steven Pinker and the Internet As someone who has enjoyed and learned a lot from Steven Pinker’s books about language and cognition, I was disappointed to see the Harvard psychologist write, in Friday’s New York Times, a cursory op-ed column about people’s very real concerns over the Internet’s influence on their minds and their intellectual lives. Pinker seems to dismiss out of hand the evidence indicating that our intensifying use of the Net and related digital media may be reducing the depth and rigor of our thoughts. He goes so far as to assert that such media “are the only things that will keep us smart.”

Science Has Great News for People Who Read Actual Books B today's soundbite-hungry media climate and the grueling slog that is a modern presidential campaign, candidates on the trail seldom break through the daily noise and strike a chord among the broader public. That's part of the reason why a video of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaking in New Hampshire a couple of weeks ago was so remarkable. The video, shot by the Huffington Post, went viral, racking up more than 7 million views on Facebook.

Related: