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Why is English Spelling So Weird?

Why is English Spelling So Weird?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhqr-GNNgGo

Related:  elaLexicology

The true story of 'true' - Gina Cooke Etymology is an area of linguistic science; it's the study of the origin of words and the ways in which their meanings and usages have changed over time. The etymology of a specific word traces the historical development of its meaning. Etymological study relies on attested forms -- that is, words as they were attested in writing throughout history. Because of this reliance on attested (written) forms, the study of English etymology helps explain why some words are written the way they are. While many dictionaries include etymological information along with other aspects of a word, like pronunciation, definitions, and examples, not all do. Some dictionaries are exclusively etymological, including the Online Etymology Dictionary, an excellent resource for learning more about word origins.

How Dick Came to be Short for Richard Today I found out why Dick is short for Richard. The name Richard is thought by most etymologists to derive from the Proto-Germanic ‘Rikharthu’, meaning more or less “hard ruler” (‘Rik-‘ meaning ‘ruler’ and ‘-harthu’ meaning ‘hard’). This was adopted into Old High German as ‘Ricohard’, and from there to Old French, then Old English as ‘Richeard’, and today as ‘Richard’. You might think from Richard meaning “hard ruler” and being a man’s name that Dick being a nickname for Richard probably came about for pejorative reasons, borrowing from one of the other meanings of “dick”, such as ‘dick’ as in ‘jerk’ or ‘dick as in ‘penis’. However, the first record of ‘dick’ meaning ‘jerk’ didn’t come about until a few hundred years after its association with Richard and the first record of it referring to a penis wasn’t until the 1890s, as a British army slang term. Exactly how that latter meaning came about isn’t known, being a slang term that was considered somewhat uncouth to put on paper.

Neil Ramsden - Morphology Micro-site * We're aiming to create paid-for versions of Word Microscope and Mini Matrix-Maker, but demonstration and test versions can be used for free. Welcome to the morphology micro-site. It has information on how English words are built up and interactive web-tools to try out. Use this page, www.neilramsden.co.uk/spelling/, as a bookmark in your own browser or when quoting this site to other people, even if you quote other specific pages as well such as the Word Searcher. Other pages might get moved. This micro-site is for anyone interested in the English writing system, especially in how words represent meaning and how they are put together.

‘Information is’ vs. ‘informations are’ – is information plural or singular in English? Tip: See my list of the Most Com­mon Mis­takes in Eng­lish. It will teach you how to avoid mis­takes with com­mas, pre­pos­i­tions, ir­reg­u­lar verbs, and much more (PDF Ver­sion). This is one of the most com­mon mis­takes among Eng­lish learners. There’s noth­ing wrong with say­ing “In­form­a­tionen” in Ger­man or “in­form­a­tions” in French, both being the plural form of “in­form­a­tion”.

Slang — language at its most human Slang is probably as old as human language, though the first slang dictionaries only started popping up in the 16th century. But nothing has been a boon for slang lexicography like the digital age, as the searchability of newspaper databases has allowed the past to be explored like never before. For fans of English at its rawest, the recent arrival of the online version of Green’s Dictionary of Slang is a major event.

The Role of a Dictionary Draft is a series about the art and craft of writing. When it happens I feel as if I have stepped into a Far Side cartoon. I am a magazine editor, and the galley of an article will come back from a proofreader with a low-frequency word circled and this comment in the margin: “Does this word even exist?” or “Is this a real word?” Usually the word’s meaning is perfectly self-evident, and the word itself is relatively simple like “unbuyable,” if not deliberately goofy like “semi-idiotic-like.”

English Lesson 21 - Gymglish - Mes activités Gulli Avec les émissions du Rich Morning Show apprends l’anglais facilement ! Et pour tester gratuitement le programme d’apprentissage, clique ICI !DES EXPRESSIONS POUR T'AIDER : "Today is our last show..." : Aujourd'hui c'est notre dernier show... "But that's ok, because in two minutes, I'm on vacation !"

Transitional Words and Phrases Robert Harris Version Date: December 16, 2013 Transitional words and phrases provide the glue that holds ideas together in writing. They provide coherence (that hanging together, making sense as a whole) by helping the reader to understand the relationship between ideas, and they act as signposts that help the reader follow the movement of the discussion. Transitional expressions, then, can be used between sentences, between paragraphs, or between entire sections of a work. The two kinds of transitions are those of logic and those of thought. Each of these kinds is discussed here. Common Mistakes Common mistakes of ESL students April 16th, 2014 in Common Mistakes In this lesson we will take a look at some common mistakes ESL students make when they speak or write English. Incorrect: I give key to the watch every day. Common mistakes in English

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