background preloader

70 maps that explain America

70 maps that explain America
by Max Fisher and Dylan Matthews on July 1, 2015 The United States of America is many things. It is the world's most powerful country, and one of the largest. It has a history of political revolution and social progress, as well as a legacy of slavery and genocide. In one sense, mapping the United States should be a simple matter of displaying borders and geography. But America is a complex nation with a long and fascinating history that could never be captured in a single frame. The original Americans Ecoregions of North AmericaThe vast size and ecological diversity of the North American continent, the third largest on Earth, has played a central role in determining how it was settled and developed over millennia. Europeans come to America European exploration of North AmericaChristopher Columbus sailed west from Spain in 1492, sponsored by the Spanish government, which hoped to find an overseas trade route to southeast Asia. The conquest of North America Slavery and the Civil War

http://www.vox.com/2015/2/17/7917165/maps-that-explain-america

Related:  Révolution américaineAmerican HistoryAmerican history

Lynchings by states and counties in the United States, 1900-1931 : (data from Research Department, Tuskegee Institute) ; cleartype county outline map of the United States. The maps in the Map Collections materials were either published prior to 1922, produced by the United States government, or both (see catalogue records that accompany each map for information regarding date of publication and source). The Library of Congress is providing access to these materials for educational and research purposes and is not aware of any U.S. copyright protection (see Title 17 of the United States Code) or any other restrictions in the Map Collection materials. Note that the written permission of the copyright owners and/or other rights holders (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemptions. Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

A People's History of the United States The Note: This great book should really be read by everyone. It is difficult to describe why it so great because it both teaches and inspires. You really just have to read it. We think it is so good that it demands to be as accessible as possible. How America became the most powerful country on Earth, in 11 maps by Max Fisher on May 20, 2015 We take it for granted that the United States is the most powerful country on Earth today, and perhaps in human history. The story of how that came to be is long, fascinating, complex — and often misunderstood. Here, excerpted in part from "70 maps that explain America," are maps that help show some of the key moments and forces that contributed to the US's rise as sole global superpower. Because of a war that left North America vulnerable to British conquest — and thus ready for the US's expansion So much of America's power comes from its size: it is one the largest countries on Earth by population and area, and is rich in natural resources and human capital.

Primary sources Raising Our Voices A True Narrative of the Rise, Progresse, and Cessation of the Late Rebellion in Virginia, Most Humbly and Impartially Reported by His Majestyes Commissioners Appointed to Enquire into the Affaires of the Said Colony (1677) Proclamation of the New Hampshire Legislature on the Mast Tree Riot (1734) Scopes Trial - Day 7 - UMKC School of Law "Read Your Bible" banner removed from courthouse Darrow--Your honor, before you send for the jury, I think it my duty to make this motion. Off to the left of where the jury sits a little bit and about ten feet in front of them is a large sign about ten feet long reading. "Read Your Bible," and a hand pointing to it.

Tyrion Lannister, Like Abraham Lincoln, Was Right About How to End Slavery “How many days were you a slave?” Missandei asks Tyrion Lannister as they make their way toward the Great Pyramid of Meereen for a meeting with the Good Masters of Astapor and the Wise Masters of Yunkai. “Long enough to know,” he responds. The Progressive Presidents - AP U.S. History Topic Outlines Roosevelt’s Square Deal At the dawn of the twentieth century, America was at a crossroads. Presented with abundant opportunity, but also hindered by significant internal and external problems, the country was seeking leaders who could provide a new direction. The political climate was ripe for reform, and the stage was set for the era of the Progressive Presidents, beginning with Republican Theodore Roosevelt. Teddy Roosevelt was widely popular due to his status as a hero of the Spanish-American War and his belief in “speaking softly and carrying a big stick.” Taking over the presidency in 1901 after the assassination of William McKinley, he quickly assured America that he would not take any drastic measures.

Essential Questions in American History: "The Great Debates" I developed this series as part of my work with Prentice-Hall supporting Daniel Boorstin’s A History of the United States. Originally it was suggested that I develop lessons on questions such as “Should slavery be extended into the territories?” I argued that most of these issues had been answered, and that it would be more engaging to frame the debates around essential questions. Thus the typical question - “Should the Constitution be ratified?” became “How powerful should the national government be?” Anyone following the reauthorization of NCLB or the proposed health care legislation knows the enduing relevance of that question.

Related: