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Jeff Nolan I always take predictions posts with a grain of salt because they reflect the aspirations of the author as much as a qualified and objective forecast of what will happen in year ahead. but to quote Bill Gates: We always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next ten. Don’t let yourself be lulled into inaction. In retrospect, it is evident we are in the midst of a profound technological shift that is rather predictably right on the traditional 10 year tech cycle, depending on when you start your calendar. Jeff Nolan
Last week the microformats.org community celebrated its 7th birthday at a gathering hosted by Mozilla in San Francisco and recognized accomplishments, challenges, and opportunities. Humans First: Admin Emeriti & New Admins The microformats tagline “humans first, machines second” forms the basis of many of our principles, and in that regard, we’d like to recognize a few people and thank them for their years of volunteer service as community admins: Microformats

Microformats

louisgray

louisgray

There's been a lot of talk about money lately here in the Valley, it seems. Whether it's a product of the exceptional $19 billion acquisition of WhatsApp by Facebook, Google's $3.2 billion Nest buy, the IPOs of Twitter and Facebook, sky-high valuations of private companies, or a real and growing gap between the 1% and the rest, discussion of venture funding rounds and money often appears to be as big a conversation point as the products and innovation that's made this place unique. As my colleague +Scott Knaster often notes in his blog "Witless to History", he and I are good examples of the typical longtime Silicon Valley employee - people who have been close to the action, but never quite in the center of it. No acquisitions to our name. No multi-million IPOs. But it's not necessarily a lack of effort on our part.
Scobleizer

Scobleizer

Why trust is the new currency in Age of Context and why Nokia lost it here. In the Age of Context lots of companies will go over the freaky line. What is that line? Where at least some people are uncomfortable with the privacy implications of the service. At EVERY speech I’ve given about our new book privacy comes up and people tell me they are scared by this new world that we’re heading into where systems like Google Now help you based on all sorts of private data, from where you are standing to who has sent you airline plans. But there are some “over the freaky line” concerns that are actually valid because they could put users into real harm.