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PLAY is LERNING

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Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain : NPR Ed. Deion Jefferson, 10, and Samuel Jefferson, 7, take turns climbing and jumping off a stack of old tires at the Berkeley Adventure Playground in California.

Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain : NPR Ed

The playground is a half-acre park with a junkyard feel where kids are encouraged to "play wild. " David Gilkey/NPR hide caption toggle caption. The cognitive benefits of play: Effects on the learning brain. © 2008 - 2014, Gwen Dewar, Ph.D., all rights reserved Science supports many of our intuitions about the benefits of play.

The cognitive benefits of play: Effects on the learning brain

Playful behavior appears to have positive effects on the brain and on a child’s ability to learn. In fact, play may function as an important, if not crucial, mode for learning. ZERO TO THREE. The Official Website of OMEP – World Organization for Early Childhood Education. Resilience is the ability to adapt well in the face of significant sources of stress and recover from setbacks.

The Official Website of OMEP – World Organization for Early Childhood Education

In other words, it is the quality of “bouncing back” (Ginsburg & Jablow, 2015)[1]. Ginsburg and Jablow (2015) identify “7 Crucial Cs” that resilience constitutes, including competence (ability to handle situations effectively), confidence (belief in one’s own abilities), connection (close ties to family, friends, school, and community), character (sense of right and wrong), contribution (understanding of the importance of personal contribution), coping (ability to cope effectively with stress), and control (ability to control the outcomes of their decision).

Being resilient does not mean that a person does not experience difficulty or distress. However, rather than engaging in self-doubt, catastrophic thinking or victimization, s/he seeks solutions and is able to rise above the difficult circumstances. How young children learn English through play. As we release Learning Time with Timmy – our first app for early-years learners of English – Danitza Villarroel, a teacher on our Learning Time with Shaun and Timmy course in Chile, explains the importance of learning through play, and offers a few tips for teachers new to this age group.

How young children learn English through play

Teaching English to pre-school children can be daunting for teachers new to this age group. Young children have shorter attention spans than older children and adults, and they're still learning their mother tongue. But teaching these learners can be enormously rewarding once you've taken a few basic principles on board. The importance of active learning. Different types play. Heuristic play. Heuristic play is rooted in young children’s natural curiosity.

Heuristic play

As babies grow, they move beyond being content to simply feel and ponder objects, to wanting to find out what can be done with them. Toddlers have an urge to handle things: to gather, fill, dump, stack, knock down, select and manipulate in other ways. Household or kitchen utensils offer this kind of activity as every parent knows, and can occupy a child for surprising stretches of time. When toddlers make an enjoyable discovery – for instance when one item fits into another, or an interesting sound is produced – they often repeat the action several times to test the result, which strengthens cognitive development as well as fine muscle control and hand/eye coordination.

In their book, People under Three, Elinor Goldschmied and Sonia Jackson coined the term heuristic play, to explain how to provide a more structured opportunity for this kind of activity. Importance of play for babies & children. Play is more than just fun for babies and children.

Importance of play for babies & children

It’s how they learn, and how they work out who they are, how the world works and where they fit into it. You can read this article in a selection of languages other than English. The importance of play Playing is one of the most important things you can do with your child. The time you spend playing together gives your child lots of different ways and times to learn.

Why play-based learning? (free article) - Early Childhood Australia. ‘ … for the EYLF to be implemented properly, all early childhood educators need to know what play is, why it is important, how to implement and assess a play-based program and their role in it.’

Why play-based learning? (free article) - Early Childhood Australia

Questioning practice The Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) is built on the understanding that the principles of early childhood pedagogy (DEEWR, 2009, pp. 12-13) guide the practice of early childhood educators. Research tells us that an educator’s pedagogy is one of the most important aspects when assessing the quality of children’s learning.