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Getting Things Done: Introduction. Last Updated Jun 2, 2011 2:38 PM EDT This column is part one of a seven part series on Getting Things Done® (GTD®) -- the time and productivity management system by David Allen.

Getting Things Done: Introduction

Getting Things Done: Introduction Before I say what I'm about to say, let it be known that (A) I've never been called an exaggerator, (B) I'm not known to over-promise, and (C), I read about a book or two a week. There are three books that have had the greatest influence in my life. The first is the Bible. I've been kind of a productivity/efficiency nut for some time, so I went into this book with great expectations -- especially after reading all the hype about it. Fast forward to about a year ago. I find that when there's too much stuff coming my way I freeze. That was me a year ago -- lots of incredible projects, ideas, and opportunities, but helpless and unable to determine where I was and what I needed to do to advance them.

Poor me, but of course there's a happy ending . . . Ugh! Getting Things Done: Step 1 - Collection. Last Updated Jun 2, 2011 4:40 PM EDT This column is part two of a seven part series on Getting Things Done® (GTD®) -- the time and productivity management system by David Allen.

Getting Things Done: Step 1 - Collection

Columns In Series:GTD Post #1: Getting Things Done: IntroductionGetting Things Done: Step 1 - Collection It's time to tap into your inner squirrel. The first step of GTD is Collection. For me, and for many, this is the most daunting step to start, but it doesn't have to be. Don't get so caught up in the full scope of Collection. If you want to have any sense of control over your ideas, workflow, and environment, you need to know exactly what you have and what you're dealing with. The 5 GTD steps are ongoing. Brain Dump - Initial Mental Collection They physical collection can be a real pain, so let's get some momentum by starting Mental Collection. Here's what you need before you start: - Large stack of 3x5 index cards (if you want to get started and don't have these, just use paper) - Pen - change oil in car.

Getting Things Done: Step 2/3 - Processing & Organizing. This article is part three of a seven part series on Getting Things Done ? (GTD ? ) -- the time and productivity management system by David Allen. Columns In Series: GTD Post #1: Getting Things Done: Introduction GTD Post #2: Getting Things Done: Step 1 - Collection Getting Things Done: Step 2/3 - Processing & Organizing Now that you've Collected, you should have a huge stack of stuff as well as a bunch of index cards.

At this point, you might start to freak out a bit. "What am I supposed to do with all this stuff? Processing and Organizing involves getting everything out of your temporary Collection Buckets and putting it where it belongs. Start with either the index cards or the physical stuff. Is it actionable? The answer to that single question seals the fate of the idea/thing. What to do if it is NOT Actionable There are three possible outcomes: Trash.

Email Waiting For Lists. Are you ready to create more money, time, energy, and passion in your life? Getting Things Done: Step 4 - Context & Doing. Last Updated Jun 2, 2011 4:30 PM EDT This article is part four of a seven part series on Getting Things Done® (GTD®) -- the time and productivity management system by David Allen.

Getting Things Done: Step 4 - Context & Doing

Columns In Series:GTD Post #1: Getting Things Done: IntroductionGTD Post #2: Getting Things Done: Step 1 - CollectionGTD Post #3: Getting Things Done: Step 2/3 - Processing & OrganizingGetting Things Done: Step 4 - Context & Doing You're not quite done organizing yet. One of the very cool things about GTD is this concept called Context. Your Next Action list might contain 50, 100, or even more next actions. Whenever you have a free moment, I suppose you could look down this list and find something to do, but if your list is long, you might spend more time reading and re-reading this big list than actually doing anything. Most time management and productivity programs have you organize your tasks by goal or due date. Context is a specific physical or mental location.

Brain. Do you get this? Context. Getting Things Done: Step 5 - Review.