Instructional Design

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University of Minnesota

University of Minnesota

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Stop Telling Students to Study for Exams - Commentary Stop Telling Students to Study for Exams - Commentary By David Jaffee Among the problems on college campuses today are that students study for exams and faculty encourage them to do so. I expect that many faculty members will be appalled by this assertion and regard it as a form of academic heresy. If anything, they would argue, students don't study enough for exams; if they did, the educational system would produce better results. But this simple and familiar phrase—"study for exams"—which is widely regarded as a sign of responsible academic practice, actually encourages student behaviors and dispositions that work against the larger purpose of human intellectual development and learning. Rather than telling students to study for exams, we should be telling them to study for learning and understanding.
Thousands of Free Lesson Plans and Educational Resources for Teachers | Verizon Thinkfinity.org

Thousands of Free Lesson Plans and Educational Resources for Teachers | Verizon Thinkfinity.org

Browse Resources Verizon Foundation proudly partners with some of the country’s top educational organizations to provide you with the latest topics, tools and trends in education. Created by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, ARTSEDGE provides resources and examples for teachers to teach in, through and about the arts.
What Everybody Ought to Know About Instructional Design What Everybody Ought to Know About Instructional Design In an earlier post, we looked at how to build better courses by trimming out some of the content. Many of the follow-up comments and questions speak to your role as an instructional designer. In fact, it’s a question I was asked in a recent email: What is the role of the instructional designer?
Instructional Design This site discusses several Instructional Design (ID) theories for creating learning processes (shown in the left sidebar), related models, difference between ID and ISD, and explains Instructional Design in some depth. What is Instructional Design? Instructional Design is defined as “a systematic process that is employed to develop education and training programs in a consistent and reliable fashion” (Reiser & Dempsey, 2007). Instructional Design
Instructional Design Models Models, like myths and metaphors, help us to make sense of our world. Whether derived from whim or from serious research, a model offers its user a means of comprehending an otherwise incomprehensible problem. An instructional design model gives structure and meaning to an I.D. problem, enabling the would-be designer to negotiate her design task with a semblance of conscious understanding. Models help us to visualize the problem, to break it down into discrete, manageable units. The value of a specific model is determined within the context of use.

Instructional Design Models

Instructional Design Models

Instructional Design

Instructional Design Related resources from InnovativeLearning.com site: (n): The process by which instruction is improved through the analysis of learning needs and systematic development of learning materials. Instructional designers often use technology and multimedia as tools to enhance instruction. How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character is a fascinating look into the important role of non-cognitive skills like perseverance, curiosity, and grit on educational success.