Geography

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Physiographic Regions Physiographic Regions An interpretative tool that can help make sense out of the large amount of information contained in this map is the regional classification shown here. Geomorphic, or physiographic, regions are broad-scale subdivisions based on terrain texture, rock type, and geologic structure and history. Nevin Fenneman's (1946) three-tiered classification of the United States - by division, province, and section - has provided an enduring spatial organization for the great variety of physical features. The composite image presented here clearly shows the topographic textures and generalized geology (by age) from which the physical regions were synthesized.
A subregion is a part of a larger region or continent and is usually based on location. Cardinal directions, such as south or southern, are commonly used to define a subregion. United Nations subregions[edit] Subregion Subregion
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Big ideas from small places Big ideas from small places Editor's Note: Parag Khanna is a senior research fellow at the New America Foundation, visiting senior fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, and author of The Second World and How to Run the World. David Skilling is founding director at Landfall Strategy Group, a Singapore-based advisory firm. By Parag Khanna and David Skilling – Special to CNN In the current phase of globalization, financial, ecological, political and social crises are occurring simultaneously and magnifying each other in unpredictable ways. From the Fukushima nuclear meltdown reshaping German politics and the European power industry, to America’s sub-prime mortgage meltdown threatening the Eurozone, such chain reactions are undermining an already fragile stability.
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UNPO - Home Mapuche: Struggles For Land Rights Continue In the wake of the governer of Araucania Francisco Huenchumilla’s apology to the Mapuche people for over a century of oppression, neglect and land seizure, this piece highlights the persistent Crimean Tatars: Jemilev Receives Order Of State Award From Turkey Former Chairman of the Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar People Mustafa Jemilev, has been awarded the Order of State award from Turkey in a ceremony that took place on Tuesday 15 April 2014 in Ankara. Iraqi Kurdistan: Turning Blind Eye On Anfal Genocide Disagreements between Iraqi Kurds and the international community continue to exist regarding the recognition of Anfal’s slaughtering of 1988 under Saddam Hussein as genocide. Although the Iraqi Tibet: Chinese Authorities Tighten Control On Monasteries Chinese authorities have increased their restrictive policies on two Tibetan monasteries, accusing them of ‘separatist activities’.
International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation Drone to assess damage after disasters Researchers of the University of Twente use a new method to list the damage after disasters. A remote-controlled drone with a normal camera takes a large amount of pictures of a building. From this, a 3D model is created, a point cloud from which the researchers can read geometric information. International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation
Physiographic regions of the world Physiographic regions of the world The Physiographic Regions of the world are a means of defining the Earth's landforms into distinct regions, based upon the classic three-tiered approach by Nevin Fenneman in 1916, that further defines landforms into: 1. physiographic divisions; 2. physiographic provinces; and 3. physiographic sections.[1] This foundational model, which Fenneman used to classify the United States, was the basis for similar classifications of other continents later, and is still considered basically valid.[2] Introduction[edit] During the early 1900s, the study of regional-scale geomorphology was termed "physiography". Unfortunately, physiography later was considered to be a contraction of "physical" and "geography", and therefore synonymous with physical geography, and the concept became embroiled in controversy surrounding the appropriate concerns of that discipline.
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