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Brain Scanner Records Dreams on Video

Brain Scanner Records Dreams on Video Just a few weeks ago, we posted about how brain patterns can reveal almost exactly what you're thinking. Now, researchers at UC Berkeley have figured out how to extract what you're picturing inside your head, and they can play it back on video. The way this works is very similar to the mind-reading technique that we covered earlier this month. A functional MRI (fMRI) machine watches the patterns that appear in people's brains as they watch a movie, and then correlates those patterns with the image on the screen.
WikIT WikIT Buzan Online has responded to criticism of a lack of academic studies showing the efficacy of mindmapping with a list of references on this page. None of the papers are linked to there, it's just a plain text list (Why Mr. Buzan?
ThinkBuzan Ref. 1 ThinkBuzan Ref. 1 Radiant Thinking So why do Mind Maps work? Can’t I just stick to my lists and my conventional tried and tested techniques? In a Mind Map, information is structured in a way that mirrors exactly how the brain functions – in a radiant rather than linear manner. A Mind Map literally ‘maps’ out your thoughts, using associations, connections and triggers to stimulate further ideas. They extract your ideas from your head into something visible and structured. iMindMap retains this ideas-generating radial process with unique organic branch drawing.
Canas et al.: Concept Maps
Canas & Wilson: Managing, Mapping & Manipulating Conceptual Kn

Novak & Canas: Theory Underlying Concept Maps

Concept maps are graphical tools for organizing and representing knowledge. They include concepts, usually enclosed in circles or boxes of some type, and relationships between concepts indicated by a connecting line linking two concepts. Words on the line, referred to as linking words or linking phrases, specify the relationship between the two concepts. We define concept as a perceived regularity in events or objects, or records of events or objects, designated by a label. The label for most concepts is a word, although sometimes we use symbols such as + or %, and sometimes more than one word is used. Propositions are statements about some object or event in the universe, either naturally occurring or constructed. Novak & Canas: Theory Underlying Concept Maps
Canas & Novak: Re-examining foundation for effective use of co
Canas & Novak: Mining the Web
John F. Sowa This is an updated version of an article in the Encyclopedia of Artificial Intelligence, edited by Stuart C. Shapiro, Wiley, 1987, second edition, 1992. Most of the text from 1992 is unchanged, but more references and updates have been added. Sowa: Semantic Networks Sowa: Semantic Networks
Tergan: Concept maps for managing individual knowledge
Primo: On the Use of Concept Maps as an Assessm
Shum & Okada: Knowledge Mapping for Open Sensemaking