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Alan Watts - Seeing Through the Game (Carl Jung Tribute) How To Be Emotionally Stable Without Getting Bored. NASA, ESA, M.

How To Be Emotionally Stable Without Getting Bored

Robberto (Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team Start as someone who loves with above-average intensity. Fall so in love with people and with things that you forget to eat and sleep. Stay up all night reading a certain book or listening to a certain song or gazing into a certain person’s eyes or just pacing back and forth thinking about whatever it is you can’t stop thinking. Know what it’s like to lose all control over the operation of your mind. Start to see this image more and more frequently, often at inopportune moments. Slide into the dark period you knew was coming.

Hit rock bottom. See a psychiatrist; get on meds. Start seeing a therapist. Keep feeling out, little by little, the inner structures of the emotions that once ruled you. There's No Such Thing as Everlasting Love (According to Science) - Emily Esfahani Smith. A new book argues that the emotion happens in "micro-moments of positivity resonance.

There's No Such Thing as Everlasting Love (According to Science) - Emily Esfahani Smith

" Paramount Pictures In her new book Love 2.0: How Our Supreme Emotion Affects Everything We Feel, Think, Do, and Become, the psychologist Barbara Fredrickson offers a radically new conception of love. Fredrickson, a leading researcher of positive emotions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, presents scientific evidence to argue that love is not what we think it is. BrainConnection.com - Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers. Dr.

BrainConnection.com - Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers

Robert Sapolsky is a Professor of Neurology at Stanford University. Dr.Sapolsky Spoke at the Brain Connection to Education Spring Conference 2000. If Robert Sapolsky wasn’t a bit of a comedian as well as a celebrated neuroscientist, he may have had his audience clenching their teeth rather than bursting into fits of laughter. For his presentation on the effects of stress on the human body and brain contained a powerful message: stress kills slowly, suppressing the immune system, shutting down growth, and eroding memory and the ability to learn. Why Zebras Handle Stress Better Than HumansMany of Sapolsky’s insights regarding the effects of stress first emerged during the years he spent studying primates in the Serengeti in Africa.

For a zebra, though, stress had an extremely short if potentially deadly span; it was “three minutes of screaming terror” after which the animal was either dead or once again roaming the Savannah and feeling safe. Kelly McGonigal: How to make stress your friend. Envy: The Emotion Kept Secret. Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes Us Warm All Over : Shots - Health News. People drew maps of body locations where they feel basic emotions (top row) and more complex ones (bottom row).

Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes Us Warm All Over : Shots - Health News

Hot colors show regions that people say are stimulated during the emotion. Cool colors indicate deactivated areas. Image courtesy of Lauri Nummenmaa, Enrico Glerean, Riitta Hari, and Jari Hietanen. Hide caption toggle caption Image courtesy of Lauri Nummenmaa, Enrico Glerean, Riitta Hari, and Jari Hietanen. People drew maps of body locations where they feel basic emotions (top row) and more complex ones (bottom row). Happily disgusted? 15 new emotions ID'd. Scientists have identified 15 new emotions such as "sadly surprised.

Happily disgusted? 15 new emotions ID'd

" Scientists have identified 15 "compound emotions"The emotions are expressed by combining the basic human emotionsThis could impact future research on psychiatric disorders (CNN) -- Until recently, scientists had only identified six basic human emotions: happy, sad, fearful, angry, surprised and disgusted. These "emotion categories," as cognitive scientists like to call them, are defined by the facial muscles we use to express each emotion. "The problem with that is that we cannot fully understand our cognitive system ... if we do not study the full rainbow of expressions that our brain can produce," says Aleix Martinez, an associate professor at Ohio State University.

In a new study published this week in the journal PNAS, Martinez and his colleagues have identified 15 additional "compound emotions. " This column will change your life: unspeakable emotions. 'The problem is unnamed feelings is a reminder of how baffled psychologists remain about what an emotion actually is.' Illustration: Ben Jones for the Guardian You know that feeling where you experience an emotion, but you don't have a word to describe it, so you resort to awkward phrases such as "You know that feeling" instead?

This column will change your life: unspeakable emotions

If so, you'll be pleased to learn about The Emotionary, a new website dedicated to finding names for those feelings that don't yet have one. Thus, for example, "emptication": the "sad, useless triumph of getting what you want, long after you've accepted you're not going to get it, and no longer want it". Or "incredulation", the surprise when something you've been dreading goes unbelievably well. The Emotionary. ( Adrenaflate ) |əˈdrenəflāt| v. to conflate adrenaline with love, or passion/drama with intimacy Filed under Trainwreckonomics on . ( Ambiviculty ) |amˈbivəkəltē| (ambivalence + difficulty) n. the anxiety of having to make decisions, typically due to constant state of self-doubt/ability to see pros and cons of every possible option more original art:

The Emotionary