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Building a Better City

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This Simple Hack Convinces Drivers To Turn Off Their Engines While Idling In Traffic. Is your city as smart as its residents? Quartz, Quartz Creative Services is the in-house arm of Quartz providing insightful stories on behalf of its commercial partners www.qz.com How can cities with 18th-century infrastructure support 21st-century life?

Is your city as smart as its residents?

Infrastructure improvement such as smart lighting and mobility innovations could save cities millions Infrastructure improvement—once considered a dry topic—is having its moment in the limelight. Expected to house 67% of the global population by 2050, cities face particularly steep challenges. Why Co-Working Spaces Are Popping Up in the Suburbs. Shared work spaces are popping up far away from urban cores.

Why Co-Working Spaces Are Popping Up in the Suburbs

This Is Exactly Why Cities Need To Cover All Of Their Buildings In Plants. The Earth Awaits is a search engine that tells you where in the world you can afford to live, given your budget.

This Is Exactly Why Cities Need To Cover All Of Their Buildings In Plants

The site's creator is a Silicon Valley engineer with a sideline blog about thrifty traveling, a blog which itself grew from a plan to eliminate debt, save every penny, and retire at 40 to travel the world. Readers were particularly interested in the retirement part, and blog posts on the cost of living in various cities proved popular. But blog posts go out of date, so the anonymous authors built a search engine to do the job.

Environment

Housing. Street design. Pedestrians. Mass transit. Bicycling. A Dead Mall Becomes a Downtown for a Sprawling Suburb. Although Lakewood, Colorado, is the fifth largest city in the state, until the last decade the city had no true downtown.

A Dead Mall Becomes a Downtown for a Sprawling Suburb

How Cities Are Protecting Small Neighborhood Shops. In Jane Jacobs’ idyllic portrait of the city, small, independent shopkeepers held a special place.

How Cities Are Protecting Small Neighborhood Shops

They kept neighborhoods safe, turning eyes on the street and making sidewalks into shared public assets, not just public spaces. They knit communities together, serving as vital nodes for getting the word out. The Rise of Resilience Planning. 06.01.16 | By Julian Spector Facebook Twitter In this cross-post from CityLab, our President, Michael Berkowitz joins Julian Spector to explore the state of 100 Resilient Cities and how resilience thinking is making an impact. 100RC engages in content partnerships with several organizations, and cross-posting does not indicate an endorsement or agreement.

The Rise of Resilience Planning

Preparing for disasters is something of a growth industry. Climate change promises rising sea levels, more intense storms, and searing desertification, even as rapid urbanization puts more pressure on cities to absorb ballooning populations. To help plan for these and other risks, The Rockefeller Foundation launched the 100 Resilient Cities initiative in 2013. 100 Resilient Cities announced the final cohort of 37 cities last week, completing the mission of bringing 100 cities into the fold. The role of cities in international discussions of climate change has really ballooned in recent years. Even Dense Cities With Transit Have High Vehicular Carbon Emissions Due to Commuters, According to a New Report. With cities in the midst of a revival, there's reason to believe they can help Americans be more frequent users of sustainable transportation.

Even Dense Cities With Transit Have High Vehicular Carbon Emissions Due to Commuters, According to a New Report

Dense urban centers with robust public transit—à la New York City—make cars seem almost unnecessary. Commuting to work with a greener alternative—the subway for instance, or the greenest alternative, walking—is often more convenient for those who live and work in a tight downtown. But new evidence shows that CO2 emissions from cars in urban hubs are still on the rise, and curbing them is more complicated than simply planning dense, livable downtowns. A trio of researchers from Boston University has developed a database that is useful for analyzing this very issue. The data set, called DARTE, shows that 80 percent of CO2 emissions growth came from on-road vehicles in urban metros between 1980 and 2012. Ten Urban Experiments That Your City Should Adopt.

A sunflower grows in Detroit at the Earthworks Urban Farm.

Ten Urban Experiments That Your City Should Adopt

As the gears of federal government have ground to a halt, a new energy has been rocking the foundations of our urban centers. From Atlanta to Seattle and points in between, cities have begun seizing the initiative, transforming themselves into laboratories for progressive innovation. Cities Rising is The Nation’s chronicle of those urban experiments. How Anchor Institutions like Hospitals and Universities Can Help Cities. Last year, standing across the entrance to the University of Chicago Medical Center in Hyde Park, I eavesdropped on a conversation about how the expansion of the hospital building had eaten up a neighborhood corner store.

How Anchor Institutions like Hospitals and Universities Can Help Cities

When a big, well-funded institution sets itself down in a struggling neighborhood, it can disrupt things. Tactical Urbanism: How It's Done. From unsanctioned crosswalks to city-led "Pavement-to-Plaza" programs, instructor Mike Lydon describes the success of short-term, temporary projects in influencing long-term physical and policy changes in cities across the United States and Canada.

Tactical Urbanism: How It's Done

Whether working alongside neighbors and family on a Saturday morning or with your co-workers at the local planning department, interventions require preparation and a framework for action. The course also identifies key resources for learning about specific projects and the larger movement of tactical urbanism. This course was eligible for 1 AICP CM credit (#e.25969) from April 2014 through June 30, 2014. How to fix DC's downtown "playground desert" D.C.'s fast-growing downtown neighborhoods have new restaurants, offices and apartments--but few playgrounds.