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You Should Care About Your Prospect’s Mom: 15 Ways to Build Lasting Bonds With Clients. When I started my sales career I was brought up in the old school way of sales -- cold call like crazy, prospect until you dropped, hunt them, kill them, and collect your money.

You Should Care About Your Prospect’s Mom: 15 Ways to Build Lasting Bonds With Clients

One and done. Account management? What the hell is that? My job was to get prospects into my funnel and close them. After that, I had no idea what to do because nobody taught me what to do. If the prospect churned the next month I didn’t care because I was too busy hunting new business -- I didn’t have a client list because the only time I was in the office was to turn in a contract or show my manager the business cards I collected (unless it was a blow-off day and I went fish bowl prospecting -- which happened a lot) Getting those cards was gold. So when I came back with a signed contract -- proving closed business -- I turned it in with much fanfare and put it up on the board, the measuring stick of sales success and worthiness. The Five Types of Virality. 7 Data-Backed Insights Every Sales Leader Needs to Know About the B2B Buyer Journey. What kind of experience are your salespeople providing to prospects before they ever pay you a dime?

7 Data-Backed Insights Every Sales Leader Needs to Know About the B2B Buyer Journey

What about before you even know whether a company is evaluating you? At PeopleMetrics, we’re interested in these answers as well. We want to make sure that every interaction a prospect has with us is valuable, and leaves them better off than before. So, we set out to answer some of these questions. We surveyed 750 B2B decision makers purchasing professional services, including 127 C-suite executives and 300 senior managers. 1) Your reputation is incredibly important.

We might be living in the information age, but when it’s time to buy, people still turn to humans they trust. It’s clear that buyers are engaging with a vendor’s content via their websites, webinars, and downloadable content. 2) Buyers invest a lot of energy into the purchasing process. The time prospects invest in the buying process is directly correlated with the size of the purchase.

How to Build an Early Customer Base for Your Startup – Product Hunt – Medium. Best advice to early stage startups on getting those first 10 and 100 paying customers?

How to Build an Early Customer Base for Your Startup – Product Hunt – Medium

— Alex Rodriguez Good question. The first ten should be easy. If you talk to ten people that are right in your target market (And that’s the trick: knowing exactly who your target audience is. Don’t waste your time casting a wide net; go where you’re loved.), four of them should want to sign up right then. A sustainable 40% conversion rate is amazing. Then talk to them. People Don’t Buy Products, They Buy Better Versions of Themselves. There is the famous story about Steve Jobs when he invented the iPod and everyone in the news and the rest of the tech industry scratched their head a little.

People Don’t Buy Products, They Buy Better Versions of Themselves

MP3 players had been around for quite a while, what was so different about the iPod? Of course, people argued many things were different, but one of the key aspects was how Jobs marketed and presented it: “1,000 songs in your pocket” When everyone else was saying “1GB storage on your MP3 player”, telling people about the product, Apple went ahead and made you a better person, that has 1000 songs in your pocket.

Our friends over at User Onboarding wrote an incredible post and graphic, showcasing how this framework looks on a higher level: Note: Try sharing the above image by right-clicking it and the choosing “add to Buffer” with the Buffer browser extension, it’s one of our most shared updates, ever In particular, the image itself proved to be popular—understandably. Features vs. benefits – how to grasp the difference P.S. How people buy your product. Marketing works best when it connects your customer’s description of their problem with your product.

How people buy your product

But not all your customers understand and describe their problem in the same way. You need more than one way to frame your offering. If you’re in the Trello/Asana/Basecamp product space, you could try the specific but same-y “Project management simplified”, or you could try the visionary but vague “Better collaboration for everyone”. Customers have many different starting points, but it’s important that all roads lead to you.

The former is direct and attracts only people who already know they need to manage their projects better. The latter is broad, and will attract anyone who thinks they should collaborate better. Cennydd Bowles once wrote “I want a spade, not the experience of digging” to show how marketing often drifts too far into the clouds of abstraction. Customers have many different starting points, but it’s important that all roads lead to you. 1. 2. 3.

User Engagement

User Personas. Reputation. Customer Care. Tools.