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Fantasy. Fairy tales and legends, such as Dobrynya Nikitich's rescue of Zabava Putyatichna from the dragon Gorynych, have been an important source for fantasy.

Fantasy

In popular culture, the fantasy genre is predominantly of the medievalist form, especially since the worldwide success of The Lord of the Rings and related books by J. R. R. Tolkien. High fantasy. Genre overview[edit] High fantasy is defined as fantasy fiction set in an alternative, entirely fictional ("secondary") world, rather than the real, or "primary" world.

High fantasy

The secondary world is usually internally consistent, but its rules differ in some way(s) from those of the primary world. By contrast, low fantasy is characterized by being set in the primary, or "real" world, or a rational and familiar fictional world, with the inclusion of magical elements.[1][2][3][4] Tolkien Wikipedia Pages. JRR Tolkien Reads The One Ring Poem. The Hobbit. Set in a time "Between the Dawn of Færie and the Dominion of Men",[1] The Hobbit follows the quest of home-loving hobbit Bilbo Baggins to win a share of the treasure guarded by the dragon, Smaug.

The Hobbit

Bilbo's journey takes him from light-hearted, rural surroundings into more sinister territory.[2] The story is told in the form of an episodic quest, and most chapters introduce a specific creature, or type of creature, of Tolkien's Wilderland. By accepting the disreputable, romantic, fey and adventurous side of his nature and applying his wits and common sense, Bilbo gains a new level of maturity, competence and wisdom.[3] The story reaches its climax in the Battle of Five Armies, where many of the characters and creatures from earlier chapters re-emerge to engage in conflict.

Personal growth and forms of heroism are central themes of the story. THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY. Martin Freeman. Richard Armitage. The Hobbit (film series) The Hobbit is a film series consisting of three epic fantasy adventure films directed by Peter Jackson.

The Hobbit (film series)

They are based on the 1937 novel The Hobbit by J. R. R Tolkien. Portions of the trilogy are also adapted from the appendices to The Return of the King. The Lord of the Rings. The work was initially intended by Tolkien to be one volume of a two-volume set, the other to be The Silmarillion, but this idea was dismissed by his publisher.[4][5] For economic reasons The Lord of the Rings was published in three volumes over the course of a year from 29 July 1954 to 20 October 1955.[4][6] The three volumes were titled The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King.

The Lord of the Rings

Structurally, the novel is divided internally into six books, two per volume, with several appendices of background material included at the end of the third volume. Some editions combine the entire work into a single volume. How Lord of The Rings Should Have Ended. J.K.Rowling Official Site - Harry Potter and more. Harry Potter in 99 Seconds. Pottermore: a unique online Harry Potter experience from J.K. Rowling. MuggleNet. Wiki. George R. R. Martin's Official Website. Game of Thrones: Homepage.

Westeros: The 'A Song of Ice and Fire' Domain. Cooking Ice and Fire - Home. HBO - Making Game of Thrones.