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Caring for the Caregivers: How to Reinvigorate Your Advising Through Easy-to-Implement Interventions - The Mentor. Caring for the Caregivers: How to Reinvigorate Your Advising Through Easy-to-Implement Interventions A growing movement in psychology, called positive psychology, has focused on promoting strengths and well–being rather than simply “fixing” problems after they develop.

Caring for the Caregivers: How to Reinvigorate Your Advising Through Easy-to-Implement Interventions - The Mentor

Given that it is easy for advisers to get caught up in the day–to–day struggles of low budgets and ever increasing student–to–adviser ratios, positive morale in advising centers can be difficult to maintain. Positive psychology can be best described as a look into “ordinary human strengths and virtues,” as well as “optimum human functioning” (Miller & Nickerson, 2008, p. 679).

This new science was developed in response to the perceived overemphasis in the field of psychology on the medical model of mental illness, which involves diagnosing what is wrong with people with little consideration of their personal strengths and positive aspects of life. Monitor Your Thinking About Your Circumstances.

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Pearltrees videos. Education. Business coaching. Coaching. Coaching Models: FUEL and GROW - Scrum Alliance. The concept of coaching originated in sport -- though historically the evolution of coaching has been influenced by many other fields of study, including those of personal development, adult education, psychology (sports, clinical, developmental, organizational, social, and industrial), and other organizational or leadership theories and practices.

Coaching Models: FUEL and GROW - Scrum Alliance

John Whitmore defines coaching as "unlocking people's potential to maximize their own performance. It is helping them learn rather than teaching them. " The underlying intent of every coaching interaction is to build awareness, responsibility, and self-belief in the mind of the coachee. Coaching models A coaching model is a framework; it does not tell you how to coach but, rather, it's the underlying structure that you can use when you're coaching someone.

Two popular coaching models are the FUEL model and the GROW model. FUEL model GROW model The GROW Model is a simple yet powerful framework for structuring your coaching or mentoring sessions. 70 Awesome Coaching Questions Using the GROW Model. The GROW Model is the most common coaching framework used by executive coaches.

70 Awesome Coaching Questions Using the GROW Model

Given its relative simplicity, many managers have taught themselves the GROW model as a way to structure coaching and mentoring sessions with their employees. GROW is an acronym that stands for: GoalCurrent RealityOptionsWill (or Way Forward) Managers can use the model to help their employees improve performance, solve problems, make better decisions, learn new skills, and reach their career goals. The key to coaching and using the GROW model is all about asking awesome questions. Here are 70 awesome coaching questions managers can utilize, categorized within the framework of the four-step GROW model: Goal: Coaching starts with establishing a goal. Here are ten questions designed to help someone gain clarity on their goal: 1. Current Reality: This step in the GROW model helps you and the employee gain awareness of the current situation – what’s going on, the context, the magnitude of the situation, etc. 1. 1. 1.

The GROW Model - Coaching Training From MindTools.com. A Simple Process for Coaching and Mentoring Learn how to use the GROW Model, with James Manktelow & Amy Carlson.

The GROW Model - Coaching Training From MindTools.com

As a leader, one of your most important roles is to coach your people to do their best. By doing this, you'll help them make better decisions, solve problems that are holding them back, learn new skills, and otherwise progress their careers. Some people are fortunate enough to get formal training in coaching. However, many people have to develop this important skill themselves. The GROW Model is a simple yet powerful framework for structuring your coaching or mentoring sessions. About the Model GROW stands for: Goal. The model was originally developed in the 1980s by performance coach Sir John Whitmore, although other coaches, such as Alan Fine and Graham Alexander, have also helped to develop it. A good way of thinking about the GROW Model is to think about how you'd plan a journey. You then explore various routes (the options) to your destination. 70 Awesome Coaching Questions Using the GROW Model.