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Compassion Pit. Coming out of Depression. Why is it when you are depressed you simply can't see any way out? Why do things always appear at their worst, even if you know things look better at other times? The reason is that depression exhausts your brain, and so makes you interpret reality in black or white, extreme and negative ways. Depression is exhaustion brought about by an incredibly stressful or emotional time. Over-worrying and over-analyzing, inward-looking negative rumination all cause and maintain depression. One way to get a quick break from this onslaught is to get deep relaxation. This can give your brain the rest it needs and partially restore your depleted resources. 'Coming out of depression' is designed to help you feel positive and strong about your future as depression starts to fade from your life.

Download 'Coming out of depression' below and start feeling better today. (If you are looking for comprehensive depression treatment, see our Depression Treatment Program) Depression Treatment. Harm Reduction Guide To Coming Off Psychiatric Drugs & Withdrawal | The Icarus Project. The Icarus Project and Freedom Center's 52-page illustrated guide gathers the best information we've come across and the most valuable lessons we've learned about reducing and coming off psychiatric medication. Based in more than 10 years work in the peer support movement, this Guide is used internationally by individuals, families, professionals, and organizations, and is available a growing number of translations.

Includes info on mood stabilizers, anti-psychotics, anti-depressants, anti-anxiety drugs, risks, benefits, wellness tools, psychiatric drug withdrawal, information for people staying on their medications, detailed Resource section, and much more. A 'harm reduction' approach means not being pro- or anti- medication, but supporting people where they are at to make their own decisions, balancing the risks and benefits involved. Download and read the Guide in English. You can also order a bound, color cover copy through bookstores. Spanish - Castellano/Espanol (printer version) Latest Shows | Madness Radio. On Hearing Voices - Schizophrenia Schizoaffective Online - Symptoms, Treatments, Resources. Allan N. Schwartz, LCSW, Ph.D. Updated: Jun 22nd 2007 A mental health worker recently wrote to me seeking information about the auditory hallucinations experienced by people diagnosed with schizophrenia and some of the other psychotic disorders.

In writing a response it occurred to me that this is a fascinating topic that can be difficult for people to fully understand. During the late 80's and 90's I spent a lot of time working in psychiatric day hospitals and continuing day treatment programs with people suffering from severe, chronic schizophrenic disorders. I came to respect and understand these people as the wonderful individuals they are. I also came to understand that they are not all wonderful people but, instead, are just people who, underneath their mental illness are good, not so good and fairly obnoxious people, just like everyone else. There is a subtlety that eludes most people in attempting to understand hallucinations and it is this: Astral projection?

Best regards Joseph, 95 Questions to Help You Find Meaning and Happiness. Post written by: Marc Chernoff Email At the cusp of a new day, week, month or year, most of us take a little time to reflect on our lives by looking back over the past and ahead into the future.

We ponder the successes, failures and standout events that are slowly scripting our life’s story. This process of self-reflection helps us maintain a conscious awareness of where we’ve been and where we intend to go. It is pertinent to the organization and preservation of our long-term goals and happiness. The questions below will help you with this process. Because when it comes to finding meaning in life, asking the right questions is the answer. In one sentence, who are you? Please share your thoughts with us in the comments section below.

Photo by: Hartwig HKD If you enjoyed this article, check out our new best-selling book. And get inspiring life tips and quotes in your inbox (it's free)... Online Support Groups for your Health Challenges. Crazy Meds: The Good, The Bad, & The Funny of Psych Meds - Main - Crazy Meds: The Good, The Bad, and The Funny of Neuropsychopharmacology. Welcome to Crazymeds, where you can learn what’s good, what’s bad, what’s interesting, and what’s plain weird and funny about the medications used to treat depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, epilepsy, migraines, anxiety, neuropathic pain, or whatever psychiatric and/or neurological condition you might have. The information on this site is to help you work with your doctor(s) to find the right treatment options. Too many of us get nothing more than 15-minute appointments with overworked doctors or nurse-practitioners, so we need all the help we can get.

We need to talk to our prescribers about the best medication1 to treat our conditions, and not the most profitable ones, or the cheapest ones2. OK, in reality “best” usually translates to “least bad.” If you know the name of the medication(s) you’re looking for, you’ll probably want our list of drugs by name. Antidepressants, like Celexa and Effexor, for the treatment of depression (duh), anxiety, and other conditions. CrisisChat - Home. IMAlive :: An Online Crisis Network. Suicide: Read This First. If you are feeling suicidal now, please stop long enough to read this. It will only take about five minutes. I do not want to talk you out of your bad feelings. I am not a therapist or other mental health professional - only someone who knows what it is like to be in pain.

I don't know who you are, or why you are reading this page. I only know that for the moment, you're reading it, and that is good. I can assume that you are here because you are troubled and considering ending your life. I have known a lot of people who have wanted to kill themselves, so I have some small idea of what you might be feeling. Well, you're still reading, and that's very good.

Start by considering this statement: Suicide is not chosen; it happens when pain exceeds resources for coping with pain. That's all it's about. Don't accept it if someone tells you, "That's not enough to be suicidal about. " When pain exceeds pain-coping resources, suicidal feelings are the result. Now: I'd like you to call someone. Experience Project - Personal Stories about any Life Experience.