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JellyRat: Scientists construct artificial jellyfish from rodent cells
Insects Find Crack In Biotech Corn's Armor : The Salt Insects Find Crack In Biotech Corn's Armor : The Salt hide captionScientists say the corn rootworm is growing resistant to Bt corn. Snbetor via Flickr Hidden in the soil of Illinois and Iowa, a new generation of insect larvae appears to be munching happily on the roots of genetically engineered corn, according to scientists. It's bad news for corn farmers, who paid extra money for this line of corn, counting on the power of its inserted genes to kill those pests. It's also bad news for the biotech company Monsanto, which inserted the larvae-killing gene in the first place. In fact, the gene's apparent failure, as reported in the journal PLoS One, may be the most serious threat to a genetically modified crop in the U.S. since farmers first started growing them 15 years ago.
Research vessel "Helmer Hanssen", which belongs to the University of Tromsø, on the Arctic Tipping Points expedition in Framstredet, may 2011 (Photo: rudicaeyers.com – BFE/Universitetet i Tromsø) Last summer when the research vessel Helmer Hansen sailed toward the ice packs north of the Svalbard Archipelago, the scientists on board were searching for life that is invisible to the naked eye. Millions of microorganisms live in every drop of the Arctic seawater. A Klondike cold rush A Klondike cold rush
Why Monsanto Thought Weeds Would Never Defeat Roundup : The Salt Why Monsanto Thought Weeds Would Never Defeat Roundup : The Salt hide captionA farmer sprays the weed killer glyphosate across his cornfield in Auburn, Ill. Seth Perlman/AP A farmer sprays the weed killer glyphosate across his cornfield in Auburn, Ill. Since it seems to be Pest Resistance Week here at The Salt, with stories on weeds and insects, we might as well just pull out all the stops. So, next up: Why didn't Monsanto's scientists foresee that weeds would become resistant to glyphosate, the weed-killing chemical in their blockbuster herbicide Roundup?
Dow and Monsanto Join Forces to Poison America's Heartland Dow and Monsanto Join Forces to Poison America's Heartland Corn, America's staple by http://www.google.com/search?q=photos+corn&hl=en&prmd=imvnse&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=V6U_T6rhJOrb0QGY4MGXBA&ved=0CDQQsAQ&biw=1564&bih=914 In a match that some would say was made in hell, the nation's two leading producers of agro-chemicals have joined forces in a partnership to reintroduce the use of the herbicide 2, 4-D, one half of the infamous defoliant Agent Orange, which was used by American forces to clear jungle during the Vietnam War. These two biotech giants have developed a weed management program that, if successful, would go a long way toward a predicted doubling of harmful herbicide use in America's corn belt during the next decade. The problem for corn farmers is that "superweeds" have been developing resistance to America's best-selling herbicide Roundup, which is being sprayed on millions of acres in the Midwest and elsewhere.
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Judge Dismisses Organic Farmers' Case Against Monsanto : The Salt hide captionFarmer Alan Madison fills a seed hopper with Monsanto hybrid seed corn near Arlington, Illinois, U.S. A group of organic and other growers say they're concerned they'll be sued by Monsanto if pollen from seeds like these drift onto their fields. Daniel Acker/Landov Farmer Alan Madison fills a seed hopper with Monsanto hybrid seed corn near Arlington, Illinois, U.S. A group of organic and other growers say they're concerned they'll be sued by Monsanto if pollen from seeds like these drift onto their fields. Judge Dismisses Organic Farmers' Case Against Monsanto : The Salt
hide captionDesigners of a food forest in Seattle want to make blueberry picking a neighborly activity. iStockphoto.com Designers of a food forest in Seattle want to make blueberry picking a neighborly activity. If you're a regular reader of The Salt, you've probably noticed our interest in foraging. From San Francisco to Maryland, we've met wild food experts, nature guides and chefs passionate about picking foods growing in their backyards. Now, Washington state has jumped on the foraging bandwagon with plans to develop a 7-acre public plot into a food forest. Seattle's First Urban Food Forest Will Be Open To Foragers : The Salt Seattle's First Urban Food Forest Will Be Open To Foragers : The Salt
hide captionDesigned and built on Marcin Jakubowski's farm, this tractor cost far less than a commercial tractor. Jon Kalish/NPR Designed and built on Marcin Jakubowski's farm, this tractor cost far less than a commercial tractor. Do-it-yourselfers have made everything from bamboo bicycles to 3-D printers, but nothing as ambitious as what's happening on a farm in northwest Missouri where tractors and other industrial machines are being made from scratch. Building A Village Starts With Building The Tractor Building A Village Starts With Building The Tractor