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4 Great Web Tools for Creating Educational Games. June 15, 2016 Below are five of our favourite platforms that you can use with your students to create a wide variety of learning games.

4 Great Web Tools for Creating Educational Games

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer) According to Code.org, 90 percent of U.S. schools are not teaching any computer science.

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer)

Eyebrows were raised in 2013 as the U.K. passed a plan to educate every child how to code. In 2014, Barack Obama made history as the first U.S. president to program a computer. Yet critics claim that often only the more affluent schools offer computer science courses, thus denying minorities potential to learn the skills required by the 1.4 million new jobs that will be created during the next ten years. In my opinion, parents of every student in every school at every level should demand that all students be taught how to code. They don't need this skill because they'll all go into it as a career -- that isn't realistic -- but because it impacts every career in the 21st century world. With the following resources, you can teach programming with every student and every age. Code Monster from Crunchzilla.

<h2>Code Monster gets kids excited about programming.

Code Monster from Crunchzilla

It is a combination of a game and tutorial where kids experiment with learning to code. <p> Code Monster use Javascript. Please enable Javascript if you want the play with the Code Monster. Otherwise, Code Monster will not be able to play with you. </p><p></h2> I'm Code Monster! Getting Started Lesson 1 BACK How to Play | Lesson Sections | About | FAQ | Terms of Use | Privacy | Contact | © 2015. Hopscotch - Make your own game. Learn to code. Code Kingdoms - Unit 1 - Lesson Plans. Bitsbox - Monthly Code Projects for Kids.

Star Wars: Building a Galaxy With Code. 7 Apps for Teaching Children Coding Skills. It's hard to imagine a single career that doesn't have a need for someone who can code.

7 Apps for Teaching Children Coding Skills

Everything that "just works" has some type of code that makes it run. Coding (a.k.a. programming) is all around us. That's why all the cool kids are coding . . . or should be. Programming is not just the province of pale twenty-somethings in skinny jeans, hunched over three monitors, swigging Red Bull. Not any more! If you're concerned that that a) elementary school students don't have the ability to code, b) there's no room in the curriculum, and c) you don't possess coding chops to teach programming skills, throw out those worries.

In no particular order, we have listed all the coding apps that are appropriate for young learners. GameStar Mechanic Platform: WebCost: $2 per student GameStar Mechanic teaches kids, ages 7-14, to design their own video games. Scratch Platform: WebCost: Free! Tynker Platform: WebCost: Free! Move the Turtle Hopscotch Platform: iPadCost: Free! Daisy the Dinosaur Cargo-Bot. Teaching Coding: Where Do You Start? EdSurge Newsletters Receive weekly emails on edtech products, companies, and events that matter.

Teaching Coding: Where Do You Start?

Soon after I wrote my last article on Edsurge “Where Does Tech-ed Belong in Edtech? ,” advocating for the need for computer science education, there was a surprising amount of activity in this area--from President Obama’s interview to the much talked about Code.org video. The timing of my article was purely coincidence, though I wish I could say otherwise! Now that we are warming up to the idea that we must teach computer science or programming or “coding” in our schools, the next question is “Where do you start?” The advocacy channels and computer science organizations (CSTA, NCWIT, CSEdWeek, Code.org) give a number of helpful links to curriculum guides, tools, online programming courses and much more. I decided to look for a starting point based on what I have seen work again and again in my programming classes. While searching for this answer, I realized that it was actually obvious. Hopscotch - Coding for kids. Hour of Code Edition. 15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer)

It's time for every student to learn to code. By Alice Steinglass May 14th, 2015 Learning to code is about more than career readiness.

It's time for every student to learn to code

It’s about helping students make sense of their digital world Recently, there has been a lot of discussion around the importance of coding in the K-12 classroom. Should it be compulsory for all students? An elective? The answer may come down to supply and demand. In 2015, when more and more schoolwork, from kindergarten up through college, is done in a digital environment, students need to know the fundamentals of how the system they are using functions.

Next page: Coding inspires curiosity [image courtesy wfryer/Flickr] New App Teaches Coding With Robots. Smart Classroom Technologies New App Teaches Coding With Robots By Dian Schaffhauser08/03/15 How can teachers push students to learn programming in the classroom through such endeavors as December's upcoming Hour of Code if they don’t know how to code themselves?

New App Teaches Coding With Robots

This question led to the creation of a new app that teaches students the basics of coding without much input from the teacher. Blockly, originally developed by Google, has been updated by Wonder Workshop to allow students to control robots through a simple drag-and-drop interface. Similar to MIT's Scratch, the open source Blockly uses visual programming blocks that students can put together like pieces of a puzzle to create a program. This fall, the company will begin selling digital curriculum aligned to Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards for second through fifth grades. The company's products have been tried out in numerous schools, including John Muir Elementary (CA), Bloomfield Hills Schools (MI) and Anna H.