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mental_floss Blog & The Quick 10: 10 Things You Didn’t Know Had Names - StumbleUpon mental_floss Blog & The Quick 10: 10 Things You Didn’t Know Had Names - StumbleUpon 1. You know how it smells after it rains? That clean, greenish smell when rain lands on dry ground?
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20 Obsolete English Words that Should Make a Comeback | Matador Network - StumbleUpon
25 Everyday Things You Never Knew Had Names: Pics, Videos, Links, News
Humans Following on from our first list of words you don’t know, we present another 25. Learn one a day and impress your friends! Another 25 Words you Don’t Know Another 25 Words you Don’t Know
10 Curse Words You Don't Know | Words You Dont Know 10 Curse Words You Don't Know | Words You Dont Know That’s one version of what happened at Waterloo and it’s a load of old cambronne, but the fact is that no-one seems to know the truth. After-battle commentary included both Cambronne saying “Merde!” and Cambronne saying “La garde meurt et ne se rend pas!”
Carl Honoré (In Praise of Slow) says Canada's Baffin Island Inuit "use the same word—'uvatiarru'—to mean both 'in the distant past' and 'in the distant future.' Time, in such cultures, is always coming as well as going." In an essay by Louise Edrich (Two Languages in Mind, but Just One in the Heart), she writes about learning Ojibwemownin and how "nouns are mainly desginated as alive or dead, animate or inanimate...once I began to think of stones as animate, I started to wonder whether I was picking up a stone or it was putting iteslf in my hand." I'm fascinated by language reflecting culture and vice versa. What concepts do not exist in the English language? What concepts do not exist in the English language?
Another 25 Words you Don’t Know
Lexipedia - Where words have meaning Lexipedia - Where words have meaning welcome n. the state of being welcome; "don't outstay your welcome" n. a greeting or reception; "the proposal got a warm welcome" v. receive someone, as into one's house v. accept gladly; "I welcome your proposals" There are no items for this category
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10 Insulting Words You Should Know 10 Insulting Words You Should Know There is a crisis of insults on the Web. On one hand, the volume of flames is very high yet the quality is poor. Gone are the days of the razor-sharp wit of Oscar Wilde and Winston Churchill*, only to be replaced by a string of four letter words typed in ALL CAPS by n00bs (the latest of which is “FAIL”, itself a failure of coming up with a more scathing insult, if you think about it). *For example:"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go," says Oscar Wilde.George Bernard Shaw wrote to Winston Churchill, "I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a friend....if you have one." And Churchill wrote back, "Cannot possibly attend first night, will attend second......if there is one" Well, it’s hard to teach wit - but all of us can learn the next best thing: the approximation of it by obfuscation, i.e. using big, difficult, and obscure words.
100 Most beautiful words in the English language*
20 Obsolete English Words that Should Make a Comeback | Matador Network - StumbleUpon
10 Insulting Words You Don’t Know | Words You Dont Know 10 Insulting Words You Don’t Know | Words You Dont Know “Sticks and stones will break my bones, but names will never hurt me.” That’s what we used to chant as kids when we got into name calling contests in the school yard. Of course, it’s untrue and it’s disingenuous. It implies that the name callers are pursuing a stupid strategy when, in truth, the right insult is deeply wounding. Consider, for example, Jean Harlow. At dinner with Dame Margot Asquith, the wife of British prime minister Herbert Asquith, she kept pronouncing Dame Asquith’s name mar-got rather than mar-go, as it should be pronounced.