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Year in Review—The most important research of 2015: November. (ScienceX)—In this new monthly series, we are offering summary articles featuring links to some of the most interesting, intriguing or popular stories that appeared on ScienceX throughout 2015.

Year in Review—The most important research of 2015: November

This is the November 2015 edition. In physics news an international team of researchers announced that the 'material universe' yielded a surprising new particle—the type-II Weyl fermion. The group found that when materials that had the material in it were moved into a magnetic field, they acted as insulators for current that was applied in one direction and as conductors for those applied in the other. Also a team of researchers working in the U.S. announced that they had achieved quantum entanglement at room temperature—they used infrared laser light to align the magnetic states of electrons and then electromagnetic pulses to entangle them. The January 2015 edition of our Year in Review series can be read here. The Health Benefits of Root Vegetables – With Recipes.

Vegetarian Diet May Lower Colon Cancer Risk, Study Suggests. Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter Posted: Monday, March 9, 2015, 12:00 PM MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A vegetarian diet might cut your risk of colorectal cancer by 20 percent, a new study finds.

Vegetarian Diet May Lower Colon Cancer Risk, Study Suggests

For fish-eating vegetarians, the protective link was even stronger, researchers said. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Screening efforts, including colonoscopy, have helped save many lives by detecting precancerous polyps, said the study's lead researcher, Dr.

Medicine

T cells expressing CD19 chimeric antigen receptors for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children and young adults: a phase 1 dose-escalation trial - The Lancet. To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or purchase a subscription.

T cells expressing CD19 chimeric antigen receptors for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children and young adults: a phase 1 dose-escalation trial - The Lancet

Click here to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Figure 1 Clinical activity and expansion of CD19-chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells (A) Waterfall plot of the percent change in bone marrow blast frequency from baseline to day 28, response, and cytokine release syndrome (CRS) grading in all 20 patients with B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) treated. *One patient with progressive disease (PD) because of a greater than 50% increase in circulating blasts. Figure 2. 3 Servings of Milk a Day Linked to Higher Mortality in Women. Drinking three or more glasses of milk per day may be harmful to women's health, a new study suggests.

3 Servings of Milk a Day Linked to Higher Mortality in Women

Women in the study who downed at least three glasses of milk a day were nearly twice as likely to die over the next 20 years compared with their peers who drank less than a glass daily, researchers in Sweden found. In addition, the study found that women's risk of bone fracture climbed steadily as their milk intake increased. The culprit could be galactose, a simple sugar found in milk, said Karl Michaelsson, a professor at Uppsala University in Sweden and one of the study's authors. "That compound might induce oxidative stress and low-grade inflammation, and that type of inflammation can affect mortality and fractures," Michaelsson told Live Science. "The funny thing is that if you provide galactose to experimental animals, they will die faster by induction of oxidative stress and inflammation. " The U.S. The women were followed for 20 years, on average. Food Pyramids and Plates: What Should You Really Eat?

Table of Contents Introduction: The Best Guides to a Healthy Diet Nearly two decades ago, the U.S.

Food Pyramids and Plates: What Should You Really Eat?

Department of Agriculture (USDA) created a powerful icon: the Food Guide Pyramid. This simple illustration conveyed in a flash what the USDA said were the elements of a healthy diet. The Pyramid was taught in schools, appeared in countless media articles and brochures, and was plastered on cereal boxes and food labels.

Woman Becomes Obese After Fecal Transplant From Overweight Donor. While they may sound totally disgusting, fecal transplants are emerging as a promising treatment for a variety of gastrointestinal diseases, in particular infection with the bacteria Clostridium difficile.

Woman Becomes Obese After Fecal Transplant From Overweight Donor

They don’t quite involve directly inserting the feces of one person into another, but rather the donor stool is rinsed and strained and then introduced into the recipient, either through an enema or endoscopy, or orally in pill form. Top 10 Unsolved Mysteries of Science. Despite what cable news may tell you, scientists don’t really squabble over if evolution is real (it is) or if the climate is changing faster than can be explained by naturally-occurring phenomena (it is) or if vaccines are regarded as safe and recommended for most children (they are).

Top 10 Unsolved Mysteries of Science

Sure, there may be fine points within those categories that are debatable, but not to the extent that is commonly described by talking heads on TV. However, that’s not to say that scientists perfectly understand everything about the ways of the Universe. Physicist Brian Cox once said: “I'm comfortable with the unknown—that’s the point of science. There are places out there, billions of places out there, that we know nothing about.

And the fact that we know nothing about them excites me, and I want to go out and find out about them.

References

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