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One University's Approach to Innovation: ‘You Have to Go Slow to Go Fast’ Let’s say a college wants to embrace new learning techniques and reinvent how it operates.

One University's Approach to Innovation: ‘You Have to Go Slow to Go Fast’

How does the institution go about it? For Southern New Hampshire University, the answer was to create a sandbox—a space where professors and administrators can brainstorm and test new approaches, and where tech startups can pitch their latest tools to college leaders. Since its creation last year, the Sandbox Collaborative (as it is called) has become an “internal consultancy” for the university. The lab has even teamed up with a venture capital firm to invest in early-stage startups. This is actually the university’s second big effort to set up a reinvention lab. Has Your School Reached an Edtech Plateau? Here’s the Key to Moving the Needle. Is It Time To Ban Computers From Classrooms? : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture. Every semester, college instructors face a choice: whether to restrict the use of laptops and other devices in their classrooms or to, instead, let students decide for themselves.

Is It Time To Ban Computers From Classrooms? : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture

And for classrooms that do allow devices, students face an ongoing set of choices: to take notes electronically or by hand, to check the textbook or the text message, to check Instagram or Twitter. This bounty of choices, and the multitasking that often ensues, may be the very problem that drives some instructors to ban devices altogether. In fact, evidence suggests that computer-based multitasking can reduce student learning, not only for those students using devices but also for their distracted neighbors. Even when computers are used for the praiseworthy purpose of taking class notes, computer-using students tend to do more poorly on later tests than their peers who took notes by hand. For device aficionados, these are dispiriting results.

The authors consider several possibilities. Even Apple (AAPL) is acknowledging that the “iPads in education” fad is coming to an end — Quartz. What guidelines do you have about how much to spend on a wedding gift in general?

Even Apple (AAPL) is acknowledging that the “iPads in education” fad is coming to an end — Quartz

It is good you have come to me with this, as weddings are fundamentally an economic transaction. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise! The goal of a wedding is for friends and family to provide the newlyweds with the basic necessities that they will need in their new home. You know, things like a dozen ramekins and an electric egg cooker. When you, in turn, get married, these friends will do the same for you. Why smart kids shouldn’t use laptops in class. (Washington Post illustration; iStock) For the past 15 years, educators have debated, exhaustively, the perils of laptops in the lecture hall.

Why smart kids shouldn’t use laptops in class

Professors complain that laptops are distraction machines; defenders say that boring classes are to blame — students have always doodled or daydreamed, so what’s the difference that they’re browsing Facebook instead? The remarkable thing about all the fuss is that, until now, there hasn’t been really great data on how classroom computing affects learning. There have been some small-scale, short-term experiments. Students who use digital devices in class 'perform worse in exams' Allowing students to use computers and the internet in classrooms substantially harms their results, a study has found.

Students who use digital devices in class 'perform worse in exams'

The paper published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that students barred from using laptops or digital devices in lectures and seminars did better in their exams than those allowed to use computers and access the internet. The researchers suggested that removing laptops and iPads from classes was the equivalent of improving the quality of teaching. The study divided 726 undergraduates randomly into three groups in the 2014-15 and 2015-16 academic years. The control group’s classrooms were “technology-free,” meaning students were not allowed to use laptops or tablets at their desk. Another group was allowed to use computers and other devices, and the third group had restricted access to tablets. “Our results indicate that students perform worse when personal computing technology is available. At Second Look, Wizer Looks Like A Fabulous Way Create Virtual Classrooms & Track Student Progress.

A couple of months ago, I shared the Wizer site as a one line piece in one of my Web 2.0 weekly “round-ups.”

At Second Look, Wizer Looks Like A Fabulous Way Create Virtual Classrooms & Track Student Progress

It looked like it had some potential, but it also didn’t seem very intuitive at first glance at figuring out how it worked, and I was pressed for time that week. Teen Girls And Social Media: A Story Of 'Secret Lives' And Misogyny : All Tech Considered. Nancy Jo Sales interviewed more than 200 teenage girls about their social media and Internet habits while researching her book American Girls.

Teen Girls And Social Media: A Story Of 'Secret Lives' And Misogyny : All Tech Considered

Knopf hide caption. Study In Your PJs? What A High School 'Work From Home Day' Looks Like. One-Third Of Schools Are Using This App You've Never Heard Of : NPR Ed. The founders of Clever met at Harvard.

One-Third Of Schools Are Using This App You've Never Heard Of : NPR Ed

From left: Tyler Bosmeny, CEO; Dan Carroll, chief product officer; Rafael Garcia, chief technology officer. Hanh Nguyen/Clever hide caption itoggle caption Hanh Nguyen/Clever The founders of Clever met at Harvard. From left: Tyler Bosmeny, CEO; Dan Carroll, chief product officer; Rafael Garcia, chief technology officer.