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Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi on flow. Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff. An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning.

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff

Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved. However, in my work, I have found that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students. This article begins with a brief discussion about the difference between the two mindsets, what that means for education, and concludes with some ideas for how school leaders might seek to develop a growth mindset amongst their staff.

According to Dweck: Needless to say, this idea of mindsets has significant implications for education. Modelling. EdintheClouds: Carol Dweck Revisits the 'Growth Mindset' By Carol Dweck For many years, I secretly worked on my research.

EdintheClouds: Carol Dweck Revisits the 'Growth Mindset'

I say "secretly" because, once upon a time, researchers simply published their research in professional journals—and there it stayed. However, my colleagues and I learned things we thought people needed to know. We found that students' mindsets—how they perceive their abilities—played a key role in their motivation and achievement, and we found that if we changed students' mindsets, we could boost their achievement. More precisely, students who believed their intelligence could be developed (a growth mindset) outperformed those who believed their intelligence was fixed (a fixed mindset). So a few years back, I published my book Mindset: The New Psychology of Successto share these discoveries with educators.

—Jori Bolton for Education Week This is wonderful, and the good word continues to spread. A growth mindset isn't just about effort. Recently, someone asked what keeps me up at night. Four questions that encourage growth mindset among students. Teachers have long battled with how to get their students to become more resilient and improve their mindset.

Four questions that encourage growth mindset among students

One popular theory, pioneered by Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford University, is the idea of growth mindset. Dweck explains that some students believe ability is malleable and can be improved (a growth mindset), while others think it is set in stone, probably decided at birth (a fixed mindset). Evidence suggests that those with a growth mindset seek out feedback on how to get better, persist with work for longer and cope better with change – all attitudes teachers want to develop in their young charges. How can teachers encourage a growth mindset? When working with young people, choosing which behaviours to praise can have a profound impact. As well as thinking of the feedback you offer your class, there are certain questions you can ask to get them thinking about their own mindset: Is the effort today worth the reward tomorrow?

This can be a simple weekend project. A Positivity Ratio to Tip You to Flourishing? Or “The Happiness Tipping Point” NOTE: The idea of Positivity Ratio of 3:1 as a magic gateway to flourishing was challenged in a 2013 American Psychologist article by Brown, Sokal and Friedman.

A Positivity Ratio to Tip You to Flourishing?

Losada, who managed the non-linear mathematical equations, was not able to mount a mathematical rebuttal to this critical review. A response by Fredrickson in the same American Psychologist issue stepped away from the 3:1 ratio as a defining turning point. However when looking at the raw data (and not the complex mathematics), Losada’s qualitative conclusions still show that higher numbers of positive interactions are associated with higher performing business teams. And Fredrickson’s data (and many others) show that more experiences of positive emotions are associated with personal flourishing. – Eric Karpinski, December, 2013 One thing that science has shown — and all of us have experienced — is that when we feel a positive emotion, it often leads to other positive emotions.

Eric Karpinski. Positive psychology. Resources for Educators. Strengths & Resources. Character Experts, Character Strengths: VIA Character. Mindset Quotes by Carol S. Dweck. 9 Effective Questions to Help Students Develop A Growth Mindset. Carol Dweck 'Mindset - the new psychology of success' at Happiness & Its Causes 2013. Fixed vs. Growth Mindsets. Positive Psychology.