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It has been an embarrassing week for security firm HBGary and its HBGary Federal offshoot. HBGary Federal CEO Aaron Barr thought he had unmasked the hacker hordes of Anonymous and was preparing to name and shame those responsible for co-ordinating the group's actions, including the denial-of-service attacks that hit MasterCard, Visa, and other perceived enemies of WikiLeaks late last year. When Barr told one of those he believed to be an Anonymous ringleader about his forthcoming exposé, the Anonymous response was swift and humiliating. HBGary's servers were broken into, its e-mails pillaged and published to the world, its data destroyed, and its website defaced. As an added bonus, a second site owned and operated by Greg Hoglund, owner of HBGary, was taken offline and the user registration database published. Anonymous speaks: the inside story of the HBGary hack

Anonymous speaks: the inside story of the HBGary hack

How one man tracked down Anonymous—and paid a heavy price

How one man tracked down Anonymous—and paid a heavy price Aaron Barr believed he had penetrated Anonymous. The loose hacker collective had been responsible for everything from anti-Scientology protests to pro-Wikileaks attacks on MasterCard and Visa, and the FBI was now after them. But matching their online identities to real-world names and locations proved daunting.
HBGary Federal CEO Aaron Barr Steps Down

HBGary Federal CEO Aaron Barr Steps Down

April 4, 2014 , 3:41 pm IE 12 to Support HSTS Encryption Protocol Microsoft confirmed today it will support HTTPS Strict Transport Protocol (HSTS) in Internet Explorer 12, bringing its browser in line with other major vendors in its support of the protocol. Read more... April 4, 2014 , 2:11 pm Microsoft to Block Unwanted Adware July 1