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Blooms Taxonomy According to Seinfeld. Creating a Culture of Student Reflection: Self-Assessment Yields Positive Results. The seventh and eighth graders in my math class at O'Farrell Community School in San Diego work in groups of five or six. One student in each group presents a stamp designed by group members for the country of Guinea. They had started the assignment by creating small versions of their designs, then rendered them as large posters -- learning math by calculating ratios as they increased their artwork in size. (Art was my college major, and I'm always looking for ways to link math and visuals.) The presenters in each group explain the decisions they made as they worked on the project, and ask their classmates for feedback on how they can revise and improve their work. These sessions, called critique circles, are one of many innovative educational practices adopted at O'Farrell as part of a comprehensive restructuring effort.

As a member of the school's curriculum and portfolio committees, I worked on devising ways to help students become more reflective and critical about their work. Austin's Butterfly: Building Excellence in Student Work - Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback. Mentor Texts | Teacher 2 Teacher Help. Prdv-72724.pdf. Whole Class Instruction in Studying Author's Craft and Intent (5-8)

Evidence-based practices for teaching writing. Amy Gillespie and Steve Graham reveal the techniques that have been proven to work when teaching students to write WRITING IS A MULTIFACETED TASK THAT involves the use and coordination of many cognitive processes. Due to its complexities, many students find writing challenging and many teachers struggle to find methods to effectively teach the skill. Gathering evidence for effectively teaching writing Advice from professional writers and the experiences of successful writing teachers offer some guidance in developing sound writing practices.

Scientific studies of writing interventions provide a more trustworthy approach for identifying effective methods for teaching writing; they supply evidence of the magnitude of the effect of a writing intervention, how confident one can be in the study’s results, and how replicable the writing strategy is in new settings with new populations of students. What does the research show? Effective writing practices Additional suggestions About the authors.

CIFER • Ohio University. Donald Murray “Teach Writing as a Process Not Product” (1972) Description In “Teach Writing as a Process Not Product” Donald Murray writes that the literature education of many writing teachers has trained us to view student writing as a fixed product. His argument is that student writing should instead be thought of as a developing process. Murray calls writing a “process of discovery,” a way to learn about and evaluate the world as well as a method of communication, and he divides the writing process into three recognizable parts: prewriting, writing, and revising. For Murray, prewriting involves narrowing down a topic, recognizing audience, and selecting a format. Date of Upload. The Writing Thief: Using Mentor Texts to Teach the Craft of Writing. It's been said that good writers borrow while great writers steal. Writing thieves read widely, dive deeply into texts, and steal bits and pieces from great texts as models for their own writing.

Ruth Culham admits to being a writing thief—and she wants you and your students to become writing thieves, too! A major part of becoming a writing thief is finding the right mentor texts to share with students. Within this book, discover more than 90 excellent mentor texts, along with straight-forward activities that incorporate the traits of writing across informational, narrative, and argument modes. Chapters also include brief essays from beloved writing thieves such as Lester Laminack, David L. Harrison, Lisa Yee, Nicola Davies, Ralph Fletcher, Toni Buzzeo, Lola Schaefer, and Kate Messner, detailing the reading that has influenced their own writing. Free Sample Chapter Table of Contents. IRA Books : The Writing Thief: Using Mentor Texts to Teach the Craft of Writing. Ruth Culham It's been said that good writers borrow while great writers steal.

Writing thieves read widely, dive deeply into texts, and steal bits and pieces from great texts as models for their own writing. Ruth Culham admits to being a writing thief—and she wants you and your students to become writing thieves, too! A major part of becoming a writing thief is finding the right mentor texts to share with students. Within this book, discover more than 90 excellent mentor texts, along with straight-forward activities that incorporate the traits of writing across informational, narrative, and argument modes. Chapters also include brief essays from beloved writing thieves such as Lester Laminack, David L. Ruth's beloved easy-going style and friendly tone make this a book you'll turn to again and again as you guide your students to reach their full potential as deep, thoughtful readers and great writers.

. © 2014 | 216 pp. Please note: you will be redirected to the Booksource website. AdLIT > In Perspective Magazine > Stray from the Conventional Wisdom: Show Writers How to Shape Writing with Grammar and Mechanics. Feature by Jeff Anderson Before we can talk about what's unconventional in the teaching of grammar and mechanics, we have to settle on what's conventional.

I'd have to say death by editing or tough-love-error eradication― you know, papers splattered with red marking off a crime scene of error. We train kids to follow the errors, to become a CSI― crime sentence investigator. Many teachers tell me, "If I don't mark up every error, how are students going to know they're wrong?

" I say stray. When I invite teachers into a conversation about how focusing on a sentence smudged with error might not be a sane educational strategy, they ask questions which range from "What do I do while I take roll? " I began with an attitude shift. Marking up errors or even staring at them everyday doesn't teach students how to think through constructing powerful sentences or making meaning with punctuation. It's not about fearing error. But How Do You Teach Grammar and Mechanics? Why Not? References Return to top. L3 08Teaching writing an analysis. New Media sem 2.2007. Teaching Grammar in Context: Stepping away from Grammar in Isolation.

Sysoyev - Integrative L2 Grammar Teaching: Exploration, Explanation and Expression. The Internet TESL Journal Pavel V. Sysoyevsysoyev [at] pvs.tambov.ruThe Tambov State University (Russia) Abstract This paper addresses the issue of L2 grammar teaching to ESL students with the focus on form and meaning. A method of integrative grammar teaching, consisting of three major stages (a) exploration, (b) explanation, and (c) expression (EEE), is proposed. To illustrate how each of these stages function, several experimental lessons were conducted. Introduction Beginning in 1970's interest in the teaching of 'real-language' has increased as scholars have become more and more interested in the language used in various social and cultural settings.

There are not many studies that compare communicative to form-based approaches. In learning an L2 grammar, students face a dilemma. Integrative Grammar Teaching As a possible solution, integrative grammar teaching combines a form-based with a meaning-based focus. Exploration is the first stage of integrative grammar teaching. Excerpt 1. Pop-Up Punctuation | Inspiring Stories from America's Great Educators.

Holly Fairbrother Year 8 (Elementary) Nexus International School Singapore 4 x 40 minute lessons Punctuation seems to cause a lot of problems for learners. I am not sure why, but many learners have failed to grasp even basic rules, such as capitalisation. Correcting their writing and asking them to read constantly to see effective use of punctuation is one way to tackle these issues. To address the differing needs of my learners, and to approach the learning from a constructivist route, I designed a mini project around punctuation marks that required learners to research different marks and teach each other about them.

I created and shared a Google Doc outlining the project, as follows- Each learner had to sign up to research and create a punctuation mark pop-up from the list in the task sheet – so that all punctuation marks were covered. I provided a selection of books on punctuation and learners were free to talk to each other and use the Internet to search for the information they needed. Engl4890jsCollaborationEthicsInWritingFall05.pdf. Every Punctuation Mark Matters: A Minilesson on Semicolons. ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals.

More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Overview Featured Resources From Theory to Practice Martin Luther King, Jr.' Note that while this lesson refers to the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," any text which features rhetorically significant use of semicolons can be effective for this minilesson. back to top Examples of Dr. Example of Dr. Example from Dr. Years of research and anecdotal evidence demonstrate that traditional methods of grammar instruction simply do not work. Further Reading. Elaine and Mr. Lippman - Exclamation points. How To Use Exclamation Marks (Punctuation) Learn how to use exclamations marks properly and effectively with VideoJug's help. Spice up your sentences with this emotive use of punctuation.

Step 1: Introduction The exclamation mark is used instead of a full stop at the end of a short phrase or sentence that expresses very strong feelings. They are also known informally as a bang or a shriek. Here are some examples: That's amazing! David, stop that! I love cress sandwiches! Aaarrgh! If a writing is trying to represent ordinary speech - in a novel, for instance - then examples like these are quite normal. Step 2: Exclamations and statements Exclamation marks also often appear after an exclamation beginning with how or what: How well did he take that goal! What a mistake the goalkeeper made!

These sentences are both exclamations, and not statements. That goal was very well taken. The goalkeeper made a bad mistake. Step 3: Surprise! If a statement is very surprising, you can use an exclamation to draw attention to the fact: Step 4: Interruptions. The Passion of Punctuation. ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives.

More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Materials and Technology Student Interactives Printouts Websites Preparation Computers with Internet accessAbility to project videos from a computer screen to a white board, projection screen, interactive whiteboard, etc. back to top Grades K – 8 | Student Interactive | Writing & Publishing Prose Postcard Creator Session Four: Let’s Talk About Colons YouTube: Seinfeld This excerpt from Seinfeld portrays a debate about exclamation points between Elaine and her boyfriend. Sean Ruday NCTE 2013 The Grammar Toolbox Presentation. NCTE Packet PBL. SG_Fresh_Punctuation.pdf. Steve peha ttms conventional wisdom. Ttms flp steve peha writing teachers strategy guide packet.

Teaching Grammar: There Has to Be a Better Way (And There Is!) Editor's Note: Steve Peha is the President of Teaching That Makes Sense, an education consultancy based in Carrboro, NC. He writes regularly on education policy on The National Journal Education Experts Blog. His work has also been featured in The Washington Post, DropoutNation, EdNews, and The Carborro Citizen. He is the author of three books on teaching: Be a Writer, Be a Better Writer, and Reading Allowed. Grammar instruction is making a comeback but in all the wrong ways. To help kids master sentence structure, I describe sentences with simple English words, not unfamiliar Latin words. In my experience, this approach helps kids learn almost instantly how to write well-formed sentences. Every Writer Serves a Sentence Take a look at this sentence: On a bitter-cold winter morning, Malcolm Maxwell, a young man of simple means but good intentions, left the quiet country town in which he'd been raised and set off on the bold errand he'd been preparing for all his life. 1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3.

Grammar Resources

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