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What’s the Difference Between “Using Technology” and “Technology Integration”? Three Trends That Will Shape the Future of Curriculum. Big Ideas Culture Digital Tools Teaching Strategies What we as adults experienced in school, as educators and students, will bear little resemblance to what lies ahead.

Three Trends That Will Shape the Future of Curriculum

Here’s a look at current trends, their implications, and changes to watch for. The Three Key Trends 1. Digital delivery No longer shackled to books as their only source of content, educators and students are going online to find reliable, valuable, and up-to-the-minute information. FLickr:Remiforall Add to that sites like the Khan Academy, a collection of thousands of YouTube videos that teach everything from calculus to the French Revolution, TeacherTube’s collection of content, books that have been turned into YouTube videos, as well as sites from museums and art institutions, sites like NASA and the Smithsonian, TED Talks and the thousands of other educational resources available, and you can start to see how online content will be used as a primary resource. 2.

Flickr:YasminF Every learner counts. 3. Lenny Gonzalez. 4 Stages: The Integration Of Technology In Learning. The 4 Stages Of The Integration Of Technology In Learning by Terry Heick For professional development around this idea or others you read about on TeachThought, contact us.

4 Stages: The Integration Of Technology In Learning

Technology can be used in the learning process in a variety of ways. Some are supplementary, serving the original design of the classroom and usually automate some previously by-human task or process–grading multiple choice assessments, searching for a source of information, or sharing messages and other data across large groups. But fully integrated and embedded in the learning process, technology can be transformative–and disruptive. Scaffolding the learning of anything unfamiliar–somehow–is a way of supporting the learner and setting them up for long-term independent success.

Should elementary school be stage 1, middle school stage 2, and so on? Should all learners begin a school year at stage 1 and move as far as they can towards stage 4? Can a planned learning experience be evaluated using this framework in mind?

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Google-search-tips-infographic-final.jpg 827 ×3.263 pixel. Skills. 10 Creative Ways To Use Google Tools To Maximize Learning. The following post was co-authored by EdTechTeacher’s Beth Holland & Tracy Sockalosky. When we think about the tools and resources that benefit all learners, certain key attributes come to mind: multiple modalities, scaffolding, communication, collaboration, and support. While there are hundreds of tools and devices available, we have found 10 strategies to maximize the learning possibilities through creative uses of All Things Google . 1. Google Docs At its most basic level, Google Docs provides students with a foolproof means to access their work from any device. On a deeper level, working in shared Docs also creates an almost real-time feedback loop. Docs do not have to be used only for assessments. 2. Imagine having the ability to know your students’ comprehension level before they walk into class or immediately after you introduce a new concept. 3.

What if your students could hear your thoughts as you read their work and provided input? 4. 5. 6. 7. 10 Video Projects Every Teacher Should Try. Making classroom movies has gotten much easier now that cell phones, tablets and other devices feature video capabilities that are high quality and simple to use.

10 Video Projects Every Teacher Should Try

And happily, we’ve found that students love to use video—it’s a format that they understand and that sparks their creativity. Here are ten ideas to try in your classroom today. Make a Book Trailer: Challenge students to design a movie-style trailer that excites their classmates about a must-read novel or nonfiction book. Try Digital Storytelling: Digital storytelling is a great format for students to share more about their lives or to present about a person in history. Film a Thank You Note: If you need to thank a visitor to your class or an awesome parent volunteer, try filming rather than writing a thank you note. What’s the best video project you’ve ever done?

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Are We Wired for Mobile Learning? Video Library - The New York Times > Page Not Found. Growing Up Digital, Wired for Distraction.