background preloader

Forgiveness

Facebook Twitter

Forgiving those who have done wrong; accepting the shortcomings of others; giving people a second chance; not being vengeful.

The Workhorse and the Butterfly: Ann Patchett on Writing and Why Self-Forgiveness Is the Most Important Ingredient of Great Art. By Maria Popova “The ability to forgive oneself … is the key to making art, and very possibly the key to finding any semblance of happiness in life.”

The Workhorse and the Butterfly: Ann Patchett on Writing and Why Self-Forgiveness Is the Most Important Ingredient of Great Art

“All makers must leave room for the acts of the spirit,” Ursula K. Le Guin wrote in her lucid and luminous essay on where ideas come from and the “secret” of writing. “But they have to work hard and carefully, and wait patiently, to deserve them.” And yet our cultural mythology continues to perpetuate the perilous notion that great art is the product of great ideas that occur in a flash to those endowed with the mysterious gift of genius. In her magnificent memoir-of-sorts This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage (public library), novelist Ann Patchett offers one of creative history’s finest and most convincing counterpoints to this myth.

Ann Patchett by Heidi Ross She writes in the introduction: The tricky thing about being a writer, or about being any kind of artist, is that in addition to making art you also have to make a living. Forgiveness. Poet and Philosopher David Whyte on Anger, Forgiveness, and What Maturity Really Means. By Maria Popova “To forgive is to assume a larger identity than the person who was first hurt.”

Poet and Philosopher David Whyte on Anger, Forgiveness, and What Maturity Really Means

“Our emotional life maps our incompleteness,” philosopher Martha Nussbaum wrote in her luminous letter of advice to the young. “A creature without any needs would never have reasons for fear, or grief, or hope, or anger.” Anger, indeed, is one of the emotions we judge most harshly — in others, as well as in ourselves — and yet understanding anger is central to mapping out the landscape of our interior lives. Aristotle, in planting the civilizational seed for practical wisdom, recognized this when he asked not whether anger is “good” or “bad” but how it shall be used: directed at whom, manifested how, for how long and to what end. David Whyte (Nicol Ragland Photography) Many of Whyte’s meditations invert the common understanding of each word and peel off the superficial to reveal the deeper, often counterintuitive meaning — but nowhere more so than in his essay on anger.

Donating = Loving. The Snatchabook (Age 3+) Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing (Age 9+) The Kite Runner (Age 12+) Atonement (Age 15+) Positive Role Model TV for Girls. Pray the Devil Back to Hell. This powerful documentary film has been screened at: · World Economic Forum· United Nations· U.S.

Pray the Devil Back to Hell

Department of State· Ministry of Foreign Affairs at the Hague Quotes "UPLIFTING, DISHEARTENING, INSPIRING, ENRAGING"—The New York Times "MARVELOUS"—The Los Angeles Times "The heroism on view is BREATHTAKING"—Christian Science Monitor "LUCIDLY IMPASSIONED"—Variety "ELOQUENTLY CAPTURES THE POWER each of us innately has within our souls to make this world a far better, safer, more peaceful place. " Promises. A beautiful and deeply moving portrait of seven Palestinian and Israeli children.

Promises

Emmy award-winning and Academy award-nominated, PROMISES follows the journey of a filmmaker who meets these children in and around Jerusalem, from a Palestinian refugee camp to an Israeli settlement in the West Bank. Although they live only 20 minutes apart, these children exist in completely separate worlds, divided by physical, historical and emotional boundaries. PROMISES explores the nature of these boundaries and tells the story of a few children who dared to cross the lines to meet their neighbors. The children of PROMISES offer refreshing, personal and sometimes humorous insight into the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. With remarkable balance and a compelling blend of pathos and humor, this Oscar-nominated, Emmy Award winning film moves the conflict out of politics and into the realm of the human.

Quotes. Sheriff Callie's Wild West (Age 3+) VeggieTales: The Little Drummer Boy (Age 5+) Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Age 8+) Big Fish (Age 12+) A Thousand Words (Age 14+) The Descendants (Age 16+) Sites That Help Kids Appreciate Differences. Close(x) Don’t Miss Out You’re all set!

Sites That Help Kids Appreciate Differences

Look out for our weekly updates soon. Connect with us Jump to navigation "Best of" Lists "Best of" lists Get age-appropriate ideas and inspiration for every interest: Poll Did this specific Top Picks list help you decide to do any of the following? Let your child watch/play/read/listen to a particular media title 41% (800 votes) NOT let your child watch/play/read/listen to a particular media title 14% (274 votes) Buy, rent, or download a particular media title 24% (472 votes) Did not impact my decision 22% (426 votes) Total votes: 1972 Learning ratings Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

Find out more Share this List FavoriteSign In or Sign Up to add favorites Sites That Help Kids Appreciate Differences. The Forgiveness Project.