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The four qualities of a perfect cold email, according to the Birchbox CEO — Quartz. Birchbox CEO and co-founder Katia Beauchamp has never been shy about reaching out to important people.

The four qualities of a perfect cold email, according to the Birchbox CEO — Quartz

Before starting at Harvard Business School in 2008, she emailed Steve Jobs, explaining that she’d been confounded to learn that her school didn’t partner with Apple. She asked Jobs to give her the same discount on the Macbook Air that her school offered for the IBM Thinkpad. The Apple CEO responded—and granted her wish. Your Book. In 12 Hours. Shut up and write the book (5 things that have helped me recently) 1.

Shut up and write the book (5 things that have helped me recently)

Shut up and write the book. I’m an extreme extrovert, which is really great after I write a book and I have to go out into the world and talk to people about it, but not so great when I need to sequester myself long enough to actually get some real writing done. 10 things I learned while writing my last book. Scrivener Writing Software. “The biggest software advance for writers since the word processor.”

Scrivener Writing Software

—Michael Marshall Smith Grow your ideas in style Scrivener is a powerful content-generation tool for writers that allows you to concentrate on composing and structuring long and difficult documents. While it gives you complete control of the formatting, its focus is on helping you get to the end of that awkward first draft. Your complete writing studio Writing a novel, research paper, script or any long-form text involves more than hammering away at the keys until you’re done. Write, structure, revise Scrivener puts everything you need for structuring, writing and editing long documents at your fingertips.

With access to a powerful underlying text engine, you can add tables, bullet points, images and mark up your text with comments and footnotes. Book Marketing Tools - Creating author tools and providing book marketing tips. Discover Meteor Case Study: How to Beat the Post-Launch Sales Drop - Discover Meteor. There’s always this debate going on in the bootstrapper community about whether you should share your numbers publicly or not.

Discover Meteor Case Study: How to Beat the Post-Launch Sales Drop - Discover Meteor

On one hand, mentioning a hard cash figure is probably the best way to make people pay attention to what you’re saying. Launch post-mortems that go over sales and conversion rates are always popular for that reason. Pros & Cons On the other hand, sharing numbers can sometimes feel a little… icky. How to (Really) Make $1,000,000 Selling E-Books – Real-World Case Studies. Who will be the JK Rowling of self-publishing?

How to (Really) Make $1,000,000 Selling E-Books – Real-World Case Studies

Better still: who will be the legions who make an extra $1,000-$1,000,000 per year? (Photo: The Telegraph, UK) This is a guest post by Ryan Buckley and the team at Scripted. I have added my own tools and recommendations after “TIM” throughout the piece. Enter Ryan Buckley and Team Barry Eisler writes thrillers about a half-Japanese, half-American freelance assassin named John Rain. How Nathan Barry and I Sold $39k Worth of eBooks (I) Six months ago, I published an eBook about user interface design, and to my surprise that book brought in almost $10,000 in sales in a month.

How Nathan Barry and I Sold $39k Worth of eBooks (I)

How Nathan Barry and I Sold $39k Worth of eBooks (II) Last week Nathan Barry and I took you behind the scenes of our profitable eBooks, talking about validating the idea, writing consistently, design software, and pricing.

How Nathan Barry and I Sold $39k Worth of eBooks (II)

Today in part 2 we talk about marketing, testimonials, and getting traffic, and in my opinion this part is even better than the first one. Enjoy! Nathan is also preparing a video course on designing with CSS3. If you want to quickly catch up on the topic you should definitely check it out. Designing the Perfect Landing Page. Self-publishing a book, Part 1: Why and How « Lennart Regebro: Python, Plone, Web. Nobody that reads this blog can have missed that I’ve written a book and self-published it.

Self-publishing a book, Part 1: Why and How « Lennart Regebro: Python, Plone, Web

It’s been a long and interesting journey, and I think I should share some of the experience. The book started out of necessity. Not mine, but the community’s. Self-publishing a book, Part 2: My tool chain « Lennart Regebro: Python, Plone, Web. As a Python programmer, I’m of course biased towards tools that are written in Python or by Pythonistas or at least feel “Pythonic”.

Self-publishing a book, Part 2: My tool chain « Lennart Regebro: Python, Plone, Web

I also had a set of requirements: The tool chain had to somehow support testing all or almost all the code.It had to be able to produce some sort of print-ready format, which in practice means PDF.Being able to make HTML would be an added bonus, as I wanted the option to make a website out of the book. The obvious choice to write this book was therefore to use ReST, and Sphinx to generate PDF/HTML from that. Sphinx goes via LaTeX to generate the PDF and writing it directly in LaTeX would have been an option, it’s used for a lot of technical documentation. But I didn’t feel like learning LaTex, and I didn’t know how good the LaTeX to HTML tools were. First problem: Testing the code The “canonical” way to test ReST code is to write it as doctests and then run the ReST source code with a testrunner. Second problem: LaTeX Third problem: Fonts The tool chain. Self-publishing a book, Part 3: Editing and Reviewing « Lennart Regebro: Python, Plone, Web.

Part 1: Why and HowPart 2: My tool chain When you use a major publisher, you’ll get an editor that is responsible for making the book a good book.

Self-publishing a book, Part 3: Editing and Reviewing « Lennart Regebro: Python, Plone, Web

But when self-publishing, the one responsible for the outcome is you. There are several areas of responsibility that normally fall on the editor even if the editor doesn’t do it him/herself. Kicking the author Making sure the book gets done is the major role that typically falls to the editor. Spell/grammar checking Making sure the language is spelled correctly and uses good grammar helps avoid the readers getting hung up on small errors.