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Autisme

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Autisme : un "faux pli" dans le cerveau ? Syndrome d'Asperger – le webdoc. Autisme : Les Troubles du spectre autistique - Dr Monica Zilbovicius. Formations autisme - EDI FORMATIONEDI FORMATION. Table 1: Neurosciences et psychiatrie. François Gonon francois.gonon@u-bordeaux.fr Mesdames, Messieurs,

Table 1: Neurosciences et psychiatrie

Bouvet_Mottron_valdois_donnadieu_2013_1_.pdf. Genius and autism may share genetic link, study finds. Four-year-old Italian child prodigy Gigino Solana, who possesses an amazing memory and a working knowledge of the sciences is seen here in a photograph from Feb. 6, 1956.

Genius and autism may share genetic link, study finds

Child prodigies and their autistic family members share a genetic link, according to new research findings. Credit: Enzo Graffeo/BIPs/Getty Images Child prodigies and their autistic family members may share a genetic link, according to findings published online for the April issue of Human Heredity. “We were very excited,” lead researcher Joanne Ruthsatz of Ohio State University told PBS NewsHour about the discovery. “It was like, here it is, here’s the autism and the prodigies together and they have a significant peak on chromosome 1, where they are significantly different than their non-affected family members.”

“This finding suggests that a locus on chromosome 1 increases the likelihood of both prodigy and autism in these families,” the study said. Wendy Chung: Autism — what we know (and what we don’t know yet) Autism and Dietary Therapy: Case Report and Review of the Literature. Abstract Title: Autism and Dietary Therapy: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Autism and Dietary Therapy: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Boy No Longer Autistic Due To Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Diet. In 2006, Ethan was diagnosed with Autism.

Boy No Longer Autistic Due To Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Diet

The one-year-old boy could not sleep longer than 2 hours – day or night. After 20 months spent in exhaustion and sleepless nights, his mom decided to eliminate wheat and dairy products from his diet. Withing 3 days Ethan slept peacefully all night long. Certain dietary changes improve the connection between the gut and the brain. Autistic children are sensitive to wheat because they have much more antibodies that react to wheat gluten, and even fight it as if it was a foreign object in the body…read more. In children with autism, sensorimotor regions of the brain become overconnected. In early childhood, the neurons inside children's developing brains form connections between various regions of brain "real estate.

In children with autism, sensorimotor regions of the brain become overconnected

" As described in a paper published last week in the journal Biological Psychiatry, cognitive neuroscientists at San Diego State University found that in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, the connections between the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum appear to be overdeveloped in sensorimotor regions of the brain. This overdevelopment appears to muscle in on brain "real estate" that in typically developing children is more densely occupied by connections that serve higher cognitive functioning. The study represents the first ever systematic look at connections between the entire cerebral cortex and the cerebellum using fMRI brain imaging, and its findings provide another piece in the puzzle that could one day lead researchers to develop a reliable brain-based test for identifying autism.

Back to the cerebellum. Researchers find synaptic link to autism. Columbia neurobiologists led by David Sulzer have made a discovery that may help explain why people with autism are prone to epilepsy and often oversensitive to noise and social experiences.

Researchers find synaptic link to autism

The scientists have found that autistic young people have an overabundance of synapses in some parts of their brains, and that this excess is the result of the brain having failed to weed out unnecessary synapses through a process called “pruning.” Scientists have long known that synapses — the connections that neurons use to send and receive signals — grow at a furious pace in childhood and must be periodically thinned out, but the Columbia study is the first to show that unchecked synaptic growth is associated with autism.

“From early childhood to adolescence, synapses are pruned,” says Sulzer, who is a professor of psychiatry, neurology, and pharmacology. Autisme: "On oublie que les enfants autistes deviennent des adultes" - L'Express Styles. J'ai été officiellement diagnostiquée Asperger le 24 décembre 2014.

Autisme: "On oublie que les enfants autistes deviennent des adultes" - L'Express Styles

J'ai 33 ans. Si mon cas est passé inaperçu tout ce temps, c'est parce que a priori, mon profil ne correspond pas à la définition classique de l'autisme. Je suis professeur de lettres, j'ai un mari, deux enfants en bas âge. J'ai eu ce qu'on appelle un parcours scolaire "brillant". Aucun trouble visible n'a inquiété mon entourage durant la petite enfance. Autisme: “On oublie que les enfants autistes deviennent des adultes” (L’Express, avril 2015) A l’occasion de la Journée Mondiale de sensibilisation à l’autisme (hier, 02 avril), L’Express a publié le témoignage d’une Aspergirl, récemment diagnostiquée.

Autisme: “On oublie que les enfants autistes deviennent des adultes” (L’Express, avril 2015)

Autism-linked DNA deletion may derail brain development — Hot hubs: Researchers have mapped the binding partners of proteins encoded by the 16p11.2 region (red).

Autism-linked DNA deletion may derail brain development —

Missing a swath of chromosome 16 with strong ties to autism disrupts proteins that are crucial for early brain development, according to a study published 18 February in Neuron1. The findings open the door to targeted interventions, says lead researcher Lilia Iakoucheva, assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego. “Getting to this more specific pathway is very valuable,” she says.

[VIDÉO] Josef Schovanec “L’autisme est une culture différente” (France 5, mars 2015) Comme je vous en faisais part sur FaceBook, Josef Schovanec venait promouvoir dans différents médias la sortie (hier !

[VIDÉO] Josef Schovanec “L’autisme est une culture différente” (France 5, mars 2015)

Douance, Haut Potentiel, autisme, troubles et dys. Beuvry : quand un autiste parle de l’autisme. Trente-trois ans, autiste et surdiplômé (Sciences Po, doctorat de philosophie, polyglotte, écrivain, passionné de langues anciennes et de religion), Josef Schovanec a captivé son auditoire, démarrant sur le nombre d’autistes en France : 600 000, « autant que d’élus » dit-il. Le ton est donné.

Détricoter les stéréotypes Un exposé débordant d’humour pour mieux détricoter les stéréotypes et balayer les idées préconçues.