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Judges for the 2017 Griffin Poetry Prize Announced. TORONTO – August 24, 2016 – The trustees of The Griffin Trust For Excellence In Poetry are pleased to announce that Sue Goyette (Canada), Joan Naviyuk Kane (US) and George Szirtes (UK) are the judges for the 2017 Griffin Poetry Prize.

Judges for the 2017 Griffin Poetry Prize Announced

Sue Goyette lives in Halifax and has published five books of poems and a novel. Her latest collection is The Brief Reincarnation of a Girl (2015). She’s been nominated for several awards including the 2014 Griffin Poetry Prize and has won the CBC Literary Prize for Poetry, the Bliss Carman, Pat Lowther, and J.M. University of Alaska PRESS. Cormorant Hunter's Wife - The by Kane, Joan 76 p., 6 x 9.

University of Alaska PRESS

Welcome. Joan Kane’s first collection of poems, The Cormorant Hunter’s Wife, was published in its first edition by NorthShore Press in October 2009.

Welcome

It is now available in its second edition through the Alaska Literary Series. “The Cormorant Hunter’s Wife is a groundbreaking collection of poems made of one long breath. The breath is enough to carry you the distance it takes to fly to the moon and return in one long winter night. I have been looking for the return of such a poet. Poems Against Loss: Joan Naviyuk Kane Talks About 'Hyperboreal' Welcome. Hold this Thought: Anchorage: Joan Kane. Hold this Thought: Anchorage: Joan Kane. Alaska Radio Reader Rambler: Anchorage Musuem Expansion and Reopening. On Saturday May 30, the Anchorage Museum will reopen and kick off more than a year’s worth of expansion related changes.

Alaska Radio Reader Rambler: Anchorage Musuem Expansion and Reopening

The Anchorage Museum will open its new wing with an outrageous traveling exhibit called Gold. Included in the Gold exhibit admission pass, visitors can see two world premieres of Alaska plays, including The Gilded Tusk by Anchorage playwright Joan Kane. Joan joins hosts Sandy and Dick, along with the director of her play, Ron Holstrom and Sarah Henny from the Anchorage Museum on this month’s edition of Alaska Radio Reader Rambler. Download Audio HOST: Sandy Harper and Dick Reichman. Broadsided: Writer/Artist Collaboration Q & A: Translation Special. Writing by Joan Naviyuk Kane & Ghassan Zaqtan. Art by Lisa Sette & Douglas Culhane.

Artist Lisa Sette & Poet Joan Naviyuk Kane What surprised you about this collaborative piece?

Broadsided: Writer/Artist Collaboration Q & A: Translation Special. Writing by Joan Naviyuk Kane & Ghassan Zaqtan. Art by Lisa Sette & Douglas Culhane.

Joan Naviyuk Kane: The visual image could be the photographic negative of topography from the air, a cell, or the detail from a larger work. Lisa Sette: The poem carried me to unusual strands of memories. Do you see an overlap between the act of translation and the act of responding visually to a piece of literature? Joan Naviyuk Kane: Yes—a poem opens up language into a lyric moment. Half a million dollars granted to Anchorage Museum's Polar Lab - Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center. Half a million dollars granted to Anchorage Museum's Polar Lab FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Aug. 18, 2014 Contact: Laura Carpenter (907) 929-9227 (w) lcarpenter@anchoragemuseum.org.

Half a million dollars granted to Anchorage Museum's Polar Lab - Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center

Ugiuvaŋmiuguruŋa/I am from King Island by Joan Kane - Literature. My family comes from King Island (Ugiuviak), Alaska, a remote island in the Bering Sea that has been uninhabited since the Bureau of Indian Affairs forcibly relocated our people off the island in 1959 under pressure from the federal government’s policy of assimilating Native Americans.

Ugiuvaŋmiuguruŋa/I am from King Island by Joan Kane - Literature

Like many King Islanders in my generation, I have never been to my ancestral home. My mother last returned in 1974, before my birth. I am seeking funding in order to research, undertake, and document a trip to the King Island while my mother and her remaining siblings-- as well as others who were born and raised on the island-- are still alive, interested, and capable of making the trip together to ensure that King Islanders remain connected to our ancestors, culture, and place of origin.