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Personal Budget Software - Free Home Budgeting Program for the F. How to Automate Your Personal Finances ∞ Get Rich Slowly. For the past few months, I’ve been moving toward a system of paperless personal finance. In this guest post from Paul Lussier, he explains his own automated system. Lately J.D. has been talking a lot about automating his finances. In my world (that of high-tech, software, and large computer systems), we strive to automate as much as possible.

By doing this, we hope to minimize error by reducing human interaction, leveraging the power of the computer for what it’s good at, leveraging the power of people for what we’re good at. In other words, we emphasize the strengths of both the computer and the human. Computers are really good at doing the tedious, mind-numbing, soul-sucking repetitive tasks which humans hate. I’ve applied this understanding to put my finances on auto-pilot. Consolidate your bank accounts I’ve consolidated all my accounts at USAA Federal Savings Bank. If you use credit cards, get a credit card with this bank and stop using the others. Thanks, Paul. Build Wealth with a “Virtual Employer” ∞ Get Rich Slowly.

Here’s the longest “money hack” I’ve ever posted. This is another reader comment from our recent discussion about the transition from “becoming debt-free” to “living debt-free”. In this guest-post from James, who is new to GRS, he describes how he created a “virtual employer” in order to limit his natural spending habits. By playing games with himself, he was able to go from $20,000 in debt to having over a million in savings in just fifteen years. This guest-post is long, but I think it’s worth it. How is living debt-free different than becoming debt-free? If you are rational (and fortunate) it shouldn’t be different at all. In my early 30s I lived paycheck-to-paycheck, had no assets to speak of, and was $20,000 in debt. Through these frugal ways I devoted 20-30% of my income to paying down debt, and was debt free in several years while enjoying my life no less.

Since I was devoting so much of my income to debt, I decided to keep things the same in the next phase of my life. Mint | Refreshing Money Management.