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Self-Service - Attendance. Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy.

Bloom's Digital Taxonomy

The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous. Bloom's Revised Taxonomy describes many traditional classroom practices, behaviours and actions, but does not account for the new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies, infowhelm (the exponential growth in information), increasing ubiquitous personal technologies or cloud computing.Bloom's Digital Taxonomy isn't about the tools or technologies rather it is about using these to facilitate learning.

Outcomes on rubrics are measured by competence of use and most importantly the quality of the process or product. For example. Key Resources This infographic links Blooms Digital Taxonomy to the communication spectrum. Applying. The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking. The Question Game by Sophie Wrobel, geist.avesophos.de The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking Big idea: Teaching kids to ask smart questions on their own A four-year-old asks on average about 400 questions per day, and an adult hardly asks any.

The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking

Our school system is structured around rewards for regurgitating the right answer, and not asking smart questions – in fact, it discourages asking questions. In A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas, Warren Berger suggests that there are three main questions which help in problem solving: Why questions, What If questions, and How questions. Regardless of the question, the question needs to be phrased openly and positively in order to achieve positive results – a closed or negative question only raises bad feelings against each other. Why questions help to find the root of a problemWhat If questions open up the floor for creative solutionsHow questions focus on developing practical solutions.

5 Movement Strategies That Get Students Thinking. Too Much Sitting?

5 Movement Strategies That Get Students Thinking

Five Movement Strategies That Get Kids Thinking by Kenny McKee Each day more research confirms the link between movement and learning. Brain researcher David Sousa claims that physical activity increases the amount of oxygen in our blood, and this oxygen is related to enhanced learning and memory. A recent Washington Post article suggests that many student behaviors we associate with ADHD may stem from an overall lack of physical movement – both in and out of school.

And How Students Can Respond. In a continued effort to bring you the very best, most expert and diverse education content anywhere, in addition to the ideas of Grant Wiggins, Bena Kallick, Art Costa, and Nathan Jurgenson among others, TeachThought is also proud to share the ideas of Dr.

And How Students Can Respond

Judy Willis, neuroscientist, Ph.D., and middle school teacher. By Dr. The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning. The realities of standardized tests and increasingly structured, if not synchronized, curriculum continue to build classroom stress levels.

The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning

Neuroimaging research reveals the disturbances in the brain's learning circuits and neurotransmitters that accompany stressful learning environments. The neuroscientific research about learning has revealed the negative impact of stress and anxiety and the qualitative improvement of the brain circuitry involved in memory and executive function that accompanies positive motivation and engagement. The Proven Effects of Positive Motivation Thankfully, this information has led to the development of brain-compatible strategies to help students through the bleak terrain created by some of the current trends imposed by the Common Core State Standards and similar mandates.

Better Teaching: Why You Bore Students & What You Can Do About It. Preface: You don’t mean to bore students.

Better Teaching: Why You Bore Students & What You Can Do About It

In fact, sometimes you’re downright interesting–the students are engaged, the buzz in the room is palpable, and even the hesitant students are asking questions. But the fact of the matter is, even the most charismatic and experienced teachers bore students sometimes. But the good news is, it may not be your fault. Judy Willis explains the neuroscience behind it all, and offers some simply tricks to help mitigate the reality that you and your content are instinctively low on a student’s neuro totem pole. Oh–the article’s title was our idea, not Judy’s. ; ^ ) by Judy Willis M.D., M.Ed., radteach.com Better Teaching: Why You Bore Students & What You Can Do About It A few thousand years ago, in 360 B.C., Plato advised against force-feeding of facts to students. “Elements of instruction…should be presented to the mind in childhood; not, however, under any notion of forcing education. Children Are Paying Attention, Just Not To The Boring Things In Class.

How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding. How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding by Terry Heick How can you tell if a student really understands something?

How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding