background preloader

Energy Poverty

Facebook Twitter

A crisis is at hand: only voting green will do. Caroline Lucas elected as the first Green MP in the UK Parliament, 2010.

A crisis is at hand: only voting green will do

She couldn’t have won without Brighton Pavillion residents voting Green in previous elections. Image: BBC News. The people of Britain face three major interlocking challenges, none of which is being addressed seriously in this election. Our economy is tanking. We’ve had a trade deficit since 1983, and rely far too heavily on an unstable financial sector to pay our way in the world: a house of credit cards which could topple in the slightest breeze. Perhaps most interestingly of all, we are utterly deluded about this: almost no British person believes me when I tell them that we are poorer than Ireland. The fiction that we are doing well is built on our houses getting more and more expensive. Britain’s economic woes are long term and entwined with those of the world.

Even in its own terms, this race to the bottom has failed. And these are our problems now. There is another way to put all of this. I could go on. Notes. Solar-Powered Inflatable Light. The Write Spot - Timeline Photos. As winter approaches, UK worries about energy poverty. With energy bills for the average UK resident rising dramatically this summer, politicians and citizens alike have been looking ahead toward the winter months with growing apprehension.

As winter approaches, UK worries about energy poverty

Writing in a guest commentary on the site MoneySavingExpert.com this week, Prime Minister David Cameron and Energy and Climate Secretary Chris Huhne noted that energy bills for most people in Britain had gone up by more than £100 in recent months. “These price rises couldn’t come at a worse time for consumers who are already feeling the pinch from rising petrol prices and the cost of the weekly shop,” they added. With colder weather and even higher bills on the way, leaders convened a Consumer Energy Summit this week to discuss ways to keep that pinch from becoming even more painful. They include: According to Ofgem, only 15 percent of households switched gas supplier in 2010 and just 17 percent switched electricity suppliers. Tackling fuel poverty during the transition to a low-carbon economy. Paul Ekins and Matthew Lockwood 27 October 2011.

Tackling fuel poverty during the transition to a low-carbon economy

Report suggests new approaches to eliminating fuel poverty. Professor Paul Ekins of the UCL Energy Institute has co-written a major new report on eliminating fuel poverty in Britain at a time of high energy prices.

Report suggests new approaches to eliminating fuel poverty

The report, published by the UCL Energy Institute, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Institute for Public Policy Research, looks at new approaches to eliminating fuel poverty following the failure to meet the 2010 fuel poverty target. The report finds that reaching the 2016 fuel poverty target is looking unlikely also, and offers a range of suggestions including how to improve the energy performance of homes. Co-author Matthew Lockwood is Climate Change Team Leader at the Institute of Development Studies and Associate Fellow at IPPR. For a copy of the full report visit 'Tackling fuel poverty during the transition to a low carbon economy' visit the Joseph Rowntree Foundation website or email Ellie Jones. Fuel poverty – time for a new approach? New Internationalist.

By 2030, as many as 900 million people will still have no electricity.

New Internationalist

Three billion will still be cooking with traditional fuel. More than 30 million will have died due to smoke-related diseases. Energy Poverty - energypedia.info. Definition by Douglas F.

Energy Poverty - energypedia.info

Barnes (Energy for Development) The existence of energy poverty today is quite well accepted around the world. Energy poverty. New approaches to Fuel Poverty: towards integrated approaches to health, energy and social justice. This event will seek to bring together organisations that work to tackle fuel poverty with social housing landlords, local authorities, public health agencies, community and residents associations, environmental organisations, energy companies, academics and government bodies.

New approaches to Fuel Poverty: towards integrated approaches to health, energy and social justice

Registration from 10.00am. Event starts 10.30am Speakers: Jenny Saunders OBE, member of the Fuel Poverty Advisory Group (FPAG is an advisory non-departmental public body of the Department of Energy & Climate Change ) and CEO National Energy Action Murad Qureshi AM Londonwide Assembly Member Jane Landon, Director of Policy & Deputy CEO, UK Health Forum Christina Marriott, Senior Manager addressing health inequalities, NHS England Ed Matthew, Director Energy Bill Revolution Mary Milne, Senior Campaigns Officer, Age UK Agamemnon Otero, CEO Repowering London Cllr Lester Holloway (Sutton Council) and Lib Dems Equalities Group Context /background. (1) how to identify if someone is in fuel poverty - Web Search Results. (1) how to identify if someone is in fuel poverty - Web Search Results.

Affordable Warmth in Argyll - Fighting Fuel Poverty in Argyll and the Islands. Affordable Warmth In Argyll Our Affordable Warmth Team has been working to combat fuel poverty in Argyll since 2009.

Affordable Warmth in Argyll - Fighting Fuel Poverty in Argyll and the Islands

Our Affordable Warmth for Sustainable Rural Communities Project provides advice, support and mentoring to older people and single parents, in Mid Argyll/Kintyre, Oban/Lorn and Bute – all areas experiencing high rates of fuel poverty. This project is funded by the Big Lottery Fund (Investing in Communities). As well as helping our target groups directly, we also provide training and mentoring to people who support them in their community, including health and social care professionals, carer groups and community groups, and volunteers.