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These Pretty City Maps Were Drawn By Our Paths Through Them. It’s no secret that tourists love to snap pictures on the Staten Island ferry.

These Pretty City Maps Were Drawn By Our Paths Through Them

Or that photographers will wander the side streets of east London capturing the latest street art. Everyone knows that Paris’s visitor-friendly arrondissements are flooded with selfie sticks on weekends. Now, a new visualization of more than a decade of Flickr photographs shows exactly what paths photographers make when taking pictures. Mapbox, the Washington, D.C. -based mapping company that provides public mapping tools under an open source philosophy and works with clients like Square, Evernote, and Foursquare, produced the Flickr photography maps using metadata gleaned by scraping the data from publicly available pictures on the site. Pan and zoom on this interactive map of New York City's Flickr data, and press "Next" to see other cities: PSFK presents the Future Of Cities.

7 Cities That Are Starting To Go Car-Free. After over a hundred years of living with cars, some cities are slowly starting to realize that the automobile doesn't make a lot of sense in the urban context.

7 Cities That Are Starting To Go Car-Free

It isn't just the smog or the traffic deaths; in a city, cars aren't even a convenient way to get around. Traffic in London today moves slower than an average cyclist (or a horse-drawn carriage). Commuters in L.A. spend 90 hours a year stuck in traffic. A U.K. study found that drivers spend 106 days of their lives looking for parking spots. 6 Major Design Trends Shaping City Life In 2015. Cities are the future.

6 Major Design Trends Shaping City Life In 2015

By one oft-cited statistic, 70% of the world's population will live in urban areas by 2050. But chances are, the cities of the future won't look quite like the places where we live today. It's up to designers—architects, urban planners, interior designers, and more—to ensure that the people-packed cities of the future are livable, prosperous, healthy places.

We asked a handful of design experts how urban life is changing, and what life in cities will look like in the new year. They delved into how the design of housing, retail, food, transportation, and more are altering the experience of urban life in 2015. The Sharing Economy Will Apply To Housing, Too. This German Data Center Wants To Heat Your House With Its Servers. The data centers that power the Internet use more energy than the entire country of India.

This German Data Center Wants To Heat Your House With Its Servers

Most of that energy is lost as waste heat. That fact inspired an idea: Why not use a network of servers to heat homes? Cloud & Heat, a cloud infrastructure company in Germany, stores server cabinets in houses and apartment buildings. While the servers crunch data, the excess heat is used to warm up the homes in the winter and provide hot water all year. The service has a second major benefit: a huge chunk of the energy used in data centers goes to air conditioning to keep the machines cool.

"We knew that there's a tremendous need for new server capacity," says Jens Struckmeier, a professor at the University of Hamburg who co-founded the company. The startup was inspired in part by another professor who happened to be building his own home near campus, and started wondering if it would be possible to send heat from the university data center to his house. [All images: via Cloud & Heat] Mapping New York's Vacant Lots, To Use Them To Create A More Vibrant City.

“We’re living with ghosts,” says Paula Segal, executive and legal director at 596 Acres.

Mapping New York's Vacant Lots, To Use Them To Create A More Vibrant City

She's talking about many of New York’s currently vacant lots. Originally cleared as part of "urban renewal" plans—demolition of neighborhoods deemed “slums” across the country from 1949 to 1974—the idea was to make them open spaces, but many were never developed. Rather, they were left as open wounds (most behind fences), concentrated in areas like the South Bronx, East Harlem and East New York: neighborhoods that, as Segal put it, “we know with our hearts are full of holes.

4 Whimsical Designs That Make City Life Just A Little Bit More Bearable. When Samantha Moore moved from Philadelphia to New York to attend the School of Visual Arts, she experienced a feeling she'd never really anticipated.

4 Whimsical Designs That Make City Life Just A Little Bit More Bearable

Little frustrations—an inexplicable 10-minute delay on the subway, someone winning a cab over her, a million little invasions of personal space—began to take their toll. They didn’t seem like coincidences. Together, they began to feel like the city was out to get her personally. Design Trust for Public Space.

Francês cria modelo de casas pré-fabricadas que produzem 50% mais energia do que consomem. Philippe Starck é um designer francês mundialmente conhecido por seus produtos de decoração e utensílios domésticos.

Francês cria modelo de casas pré-fabricadas que produzem 50% mais energia do que consomem

Mas seu trabalho também tem muita força na área de design de móveis. Foi com esse expertise que ele desenvolveu uma série de casas pré-fabricadas de baixo consumo de energia, com uma estrutura feita de vidro e alumínio. O modelo é chamado de Montfort e é a segunda série de Starck de casas sob encomenda. Elas são produzidas em parceria com a Riko, um dos principais fabricantes europeus de construções de madeira pré-fabricadas.

A coleção foi chamada de PATH e é a sigla de “Prefabricated Accessible Technological Homes”, em português, “Casas pré-fabricadas tecnologicamente acessíveis”, e é composta por quatro tipos diferentes de residências, todos projetados para consumir um terço da energia de uma casa tradicional. Cada casa de dois andares produz 50% mais energia do que consome, em grande parte graças a uma variedade de “sistemas de eco-tecnologia” escondidos no telhado. Building smart cities.