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More Than a Decade In, and Internet Comments Continue to Be Terrible - Rebecca J. Rosen - Technology It's just not easy to build a system that allows for smart ongoing conversations among large groups of people So many things about the Internet have become pretty awesome over the past decade or so, but there is one thing, however, that remains dysfunctional: comments. They continue to be terrible, and it's not only because of trolls and morons. Internet comments are hard to read and harder to engage with. Even in places with smart, thoughtful readers, the comment sections tend to be more like lists of unconnected ideas than genuine conversations. The problem is simply that it's hard to build a system that allows for smart ongoing conversations among large groups of people. More Than a Decade In, and Internet Comments Continue to Be Terrible - Rebecca J. Rosen - Technology
Trust in the media Trust in the media Report shows UK trust in media dented by phone-hacking scandal; TV is most trusted outlet The UK public still sees traditional media, such as TV and radio, as the most trustworthy media outlets, the first Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) UK Trust Report has found, as the American TV channel launches in the UK. The poll, of 1,108 UK adults and 1,095 US adults, also found that this summer’s phone-hacking scandal has resulted in media mistrust among members the public. 64% of UK adults saw TV as the most trusted media outlet58% said the same about radio38% trusted newspapers, while 25% thought the same about magazinesInterestingly, websites saw a high level of trust (55%)But blogs are trusted by under one in ten people (9%)While Facebook and Twitter are trusted by only 15% of UK people as a place to get trusted media content, despite their huge numbers of users
The Lede Desk: Fighting the Scourge of Boring Writing | Degrees of Freedom The Lede Desk: Fighting the Scourge of Boring Writing | Degrees of Freedom It was a dark and stormy night in New York City, so why was I instead slouching on my couch in sunny Rome? Because I was concocting a weather report-anecdote-question-postural opening for this blog post. It is probably safe to say that no journalist is fully immune from cliches, especially in the openings of their articles, which many of us insist on calling ledes (in that cliquish, intentionally misspelled way, just like we write “graf” for paragraph, “hed” for headline, and so on).
Update August 20, 2011, 4:39 pm PDT : be sure to read the message from EpiRen, René Najera in the comments EpiRen is the twitter handle of René Najera. His twitter account was linked to his blog, which had his real name and his place of employ. He has been a great credit to the epidemiology and public health professions through his public blogging, blog commenting, and twitter use. A Public Servant, Blogging and Tweeting Under His Own Name, Has Been Silenced By His Employers - I Speak of Dreams A Public Servant, Blogging and Tweeting Under His Own Name, Has Been Silenced By His Employers - I Speak of Dreams
England riots: where they happened and where suspects lived | Mapped | News England riots: where they happened and where suspects lived | Mapped | News Did rioters commute in for the looting? That is a theory being explored by police and politicians. And as hundreds of suspected looters are pushed through the magistrates courts, what information does it tell us about how the events of those nights in early August unfolded?
How the NYT paywall is working When I wrote about the success of the NYT paywall last month, I got a lot of pushback in the comments and on Twitter. Here’s a sample: “The fact people pay speaks more people’s average techno-illiteracy/laziness about how to change a link address in their browser than anything else.”“Add ? How the NYT paywall is working
New system could make censorship of Internet sites virtually impossible Chinese citizens could once again enjoy LOL Cats on YouTube - as well as content critical of the communist government - if a new system developed by researchers at the University of Michigan (U-M) and the University of Waterloo (UW) in Canada were implemented. The researchers claim the system, called Telex, would thwart Internet censorship and make it virtually impossible for a censoring government to block individual sites by essentially turning the entire web into a proxy server. While those looking to circumvent site blocks can currently route requests through a proxy server that acts as an intermediary from clients seeking to connect with blocked servers, censors are able to monitor the content of traffic on the whole network so they are able to eventually find and block the proxy too. "It creates a kind of cat and mouse game," said J. New system could make censorship of Internet sites virtually impossible
Could the UK Government shut down the web? | Web 2.0 Register a .co.uk domain name or choose from our other domains Did you know that 4 in 5 people prefer websites with a .co.uk extension when searching online? So, whether you're a professional just starting out online or a company doing business in the UK, get your perfect .co.uk domain today and help your audience find your site easier on the World Wide Web. With the UK's online economy set to grow by 10% this year, now's the time to secure your perfect .co.uk domain and tell the world you're doing business in the UK. If you're looking to secure your brand name across different extensions, we've also got you covered. We're the UK's largest domain registrar so, whether you want to register a .com, .net, .info or maybe one of the new generic top level domains like .london, there's no better place to get yours than 123-reg.

Could the UK Government shut down the web? | Web 2.0

Passing A Good Joke Along The Wire | Sunday Magazine
Spam Bots Flooding Twitter to Drown Info About #Syria Protests [Updated] Spam Bots Flooding Twitter to Drown Info About #Syria Protests [Updated] Defining The Issues People following the #Syria hash tag on Twitter in the recent weeks to track the developments of the Syrian protests and the deadly governmental crackdown on peaceful protesters must have noticed two major annoyances: First was the proliferation of what tweeps dubbed as the “twitter eggs,” a group of newly created and mostly image-less twitter accounts that cussed out, verbally assaulted, and threatened anyone tweeting favorably about the ongoing protests, or criticizing the regime.
Intro to jEdit: A Programmer's Text Editor Oct 07, 2010, 09:03 (0 Talkback[s]) (Other stories by Joe 'Zonker' Brockmeier) "Looking for a powerful, cross-platform, text editor? Look no farther than jEdit, a Java-based text editor specifically aimed at programmers but suitable for all types of users." Intro to jEdit: A Programmer's Text Editor
Dead Letters: an excerpt from Speaking into the Air by John Durham Peters An excerpt fromSpeaking into the AirA History of the Idea of Communicationby John Durham Peters Dead Letters Nautch joints are depressing, like all places for deposit, banks, mail boxes, tombs, vending machines.—Nathanael West, The Day of the Locust Strangely enough, little research in media history has been done on the original context of communication that is most explicitly hermeneutic: correspondence by letter. Media historians are beginning to take the post office seriously as a key site for understanding the development of communications.
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