background preloader

Nature

Facebook Twitter

52 Wild Plants You Can Eat - Updated. In addition to using the list below as a resource, consider the importance of properly educating yourself before consuming wild plants.

52 Wild Plants You Can Eat - Updated

Below are some resources to consider: Stalking the Wild Asparagus and Stalking The Healthful Herbs by Euell Gibbons Edible Wild Plants by John Kallas Ph.D. Wild Cards: Edible Wild Foods and The Essential Wild Food Survival Guide by Linda Runyon We all know which vegetables and fruits are safe to eat, but what about other wild edibles? 1. Many wild berries are not safe to eat, it’s best to stay away from them. 2.

The easiest to recognize if the dandelion, in the spring they show their bright yellow buds. 3. The vegetable that makes your pee smell funny grows in the wild in most of Europe and parts of North Africa, West Asia, and North America. Élégant Noël Holly traditionnel et pin Swag par WillowgaleDesigns. 5 Amazing Trigger Points To Relieve Pain. I know I have a lot of stress built up just from going about my day to day life.

5 Amazing Trigger Points To Relieve Pain

Finally, there are some interesting new methods that I’ve learned that can definitely help you out in a stressful situation. However, everyone’s pain is unique and different. Please always consult your physician, especially if you are pregnant, your pain is acute or intense, or if your symptoms are combined with fever and abdominal discomfort. Neck Pain (empower point) Where is it? What does it do?

Low Back Pain. Permaculture - What Is It and Why Is It Important? 18th March 2015 By Phil Watt Guest Writer for Wake Up World Developed by Australians Bill Mollison and David Holmgren in the 1970’s, permaculture has spread wildly throughout the world.

Permaculture - What Is It and Why Is It Important?

The term initially meant ‘permanent agriculture’, however it evolved to also represent ‘permanent culture’. Permaculture is the ethical, scientific and synchronistic design of natural systems to ensure a sustainable philosophy of living. Due to the unsustainable agricultural practices that we currently employ, permaculture is also an evidence-based solution to the self-destructive path we are on. What is Permaculture? Permaculture is working in conjunction with nature, not against it.

Foraging: 52 Wild Plants You Can Eat. Here are a few common North American goodies that are safe to eat if you find yourself stuck in the wild: Blackberries: Many wild berries are not safe to eat, it’s best to stay away from them.

Foraging: 52 Wild Plants You Can Eat

But wild blackberries are 100% safe to eat and easy to recognize. They have red branches that have long thorns similar to a rose, the green leaves are wide and jagged. They are best to find in the spring when their white flowers bloom, they are clustered all around the bush and their flowers have 5 points. Dandelions: The easiest to recognize is the dandelion, in the spring they show their bright yellow buds. Asparagus: The vegetable that makes your pee smell funny grows in the wild in most of Europe and parts of North Africa, West Asia, and North America.

Elderberries: An elderberry shrub can grow easily grow about 10 feet and yield tons of food, their leaf structure is usually 7 main leaves on a long stretched out stem, the leaves are long and round and the leaves themselves have jagged edges. Gleaning. A group of us in Goshen got together last night for an evening of gleaning, and ohhhh, what a lovely, lovely time!

Gleaning

Transition Goshen has a project called, “The Low Hanging Fruit Press,” which many of us crowd funded so that we could purchase a community cider press. As a side part of this project, we also began to map fruit trees in town — on private or public property — in need of harvesting. Many people buy homes that already have fruit trees planted, and they find these trees a nuisance rather than a boon. With permission, those people who do appreciate the abundance of free fruit can save the homeowners a lot of work. In some cases, a timely harvest will even save tree limbs from breaking with the weight of unpicked fruit. I have eaten a lot of apples in my life, but I’ve never actually harvested one from a tree. Something magical happened to me as I approached the trees at sunset. Food Foraging: Find and Enjoy Wild Edible Plants. We owe a lasting debt of gratitude to the desperate soul who “discovered” the oyster or stewed that first possum.

Food Foraging: Find and Enjoy Wild Edible Plants

In the early, hit-or-miss days of foraging, our ancestors learned the hard way about the laxative properties of the senna plant, and to eat only the stems of rhubarb and not the poisonous leaves. Through trial and the occasional fatal error, we sorted the edible from the inedible, the useful from the harmful. After World War II, when American agriculture was fully conquered by industry and supermarkets full of frozen foods popped up across the land — yes, like weeds — foraging came to be regarded as uncouth, probably unhealthy and certainly out of step with modern times. Why then, a half-century later, do we find purslane — a vigorous, succulent “weed” once routinely cursed by gardeners — on the menu of nearly every fine dining restaurant in the country? Kerri Conan blogs for The New York Times, and keeps a sharp eye on food trends. Learning the Art of Food Foraging 1. 2. 3.