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Pacific ocean plate tectonic evolution. Return to Animations Evolution of the Pacific Ocean (150 mya - Present) The Pacific Ocean is the world's largest ocean, covering nearly one-half of the globe. Though huge, the Pacific is getting smaller. It was once much wider when all the continents were joined together in the supercontinent, Pangea.

The Pacific ocean basin is getting smaller because the Atlantic Ocean is opening and North America and South America are moving westward. Breakup of gondwana. Blooms Taxonomy Tutorial FLASH - CCCS Faculty Wiki. Forces on a Current-Carrying Wire. CELLS alive! Gallery. Mitosis: An Interactive Animation. Physics of Superheroes 2 - Electro & Magneto. Physics Flash Animations. We have been increasingly using Flash animations for illustrating Physics content.

Physics Flash Animations

This page provides access to those animations which may be of general interest. The animations will appear in a separate window. The animations are sorted by category, and the file size of each animation is included in the listing. Charging an Electrophorus by Induction Using a Negatively Charge. Inducing a Positive Charge on a Sphere. Charging a Two-Sphere System by Induction Using a Negative Objec. Multimedia Physics Studios - Table of Contents. Ripple tank circular wave reflection. Ripple tank: circular wave reflection Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation demonstrating circular wave reflection in a ripple tank.

Ripple tank circular wave reflection

Click in the water to generate a circular wave that undergoes reflection at the tank boundary. This resource is from the unit Bouncing Waves which is part of Absorb Physics. The full Absorb Physics course normally sells for £400 - but you can get it free for your school! Momentum Main Page. The electromagnetic spectrum. The electromagnetic spectrum Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation showing the electromagnetic spectrum.

The electromagnetic spectrum

Place the cursor over the different parts of the spectrum to find out what they are, how the waves are generated, what materials they pass through and what they are absorbed by. IR camera. IR camera Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation showing a night-time view of a town.

IR camera

Click on the animation to view the scene using an infra-red camera. Ask pupils to identify what they can see. Real waves on water. Real waves on water Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation illustrating how real water waves propagate.

Real waves on water

The motion of water molecules on the surface of the water is highlighted to demonstrate that they move in circles. Diverging lens. Diverging lens Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation demonstrating the virtual image of a pencil produced by a diverging lens.

Diverging lens

Move the object pencil left and right to observe the image produced. Converging lens. Converging lens Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation demonstrating the real and virtual images of a pencil produced by a converging lens.

Converging lens

Move the object pencil left and right to observe the image produced. This resource is from the unit Converging Lenses which is part of Absorb Physics. The full Absorb Physics course normally sells for £400 - but you can get it free for your school! Combining waves 2 destructive interference. Combining waves 2: destructive interference Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation demonstrating destructive interference.

Combining waves 2 destructive interference

Three strings of beads are shown: one travelling right to left; the second travelling left to right and the third is the superposition of the first two. Use the slider to propagate a wave or use the step button to slow down the animation. This resource is from the unit Interference which is part of Absorb Physics. Combining waves 1 constructive interference. Combining waves 1: constructive interference Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation demonstrating constructive interference.

Combining waves 1 constructive interference

Three strings of beads are shown: one travelling right to left; the second travelling left to right and the third is the superposition of the first two. Use the slider to propagate a wave or use the step button to slow down the animation. A wave squeezing a spring. A wave: squeezing a spring Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation illustrating a longitudinal wave.

A wave squeezing a spring

Click the arrow button to play the animation. Investigating weight and upthrust. Investigating weight and upthrust Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation illustrating upthrust with a rock and an apple. Click the arrow button to lower an object into the water and raise it again. A spring balance displays the apparent weight of the object in and out of the water. Click the arrow button to change the object. Balancing a seesaw. Balancing a seesaw Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation demonstrates a seesaw. Two weights on the seesaw and moved backwards and forward and their weight adjusted to balance or unbalance the seesaw. A ball moving in a circle.

A ball moving in a circle Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation illustrating how centripetal force depends on mass, radial distance and speed. The cell an electron pump. The cell: an electron pump Added by David Fairhurst on Feb 6, 2008 An interactive animation showing a cell as an electron pump. Electrons flow round the circuit, gaining electrical potential energy in the cell and losing it to a coil of wire. Click the arrow button to close the switch. Spraying a car. Oersted's experiment. Generating electricity. Magnetic field solenoid. A moving magnet in a coil. A moving wire in a magnetic field measuring the induced current. A gold-leaf electroscope. Rutherford's experiment. Home of CELLS alive! Science Revision - Games and Activities.