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Aerochromics: Pollution Monitoring Garments Aim to Become A Sixth Skin. Speculative design is a provocative tool that generates more conversations than sales.

Aerochromics: Pollution Monitoring Garments Aim to Become A Sixth Skin

Writing speculative future narratives challenge designers to focus more on the “why” with end results that typically straddle the world of art and design, technology and fiction, commerce and social good. Aerochromics is a speculative fashion project crafted by Nikolas Bentel that imagines a future dystopia marred by pollution. The environmentally reactive garments become a tool to bring awareness to environmental pollution — making the invisible toxins that we breathe visible. The garments react to three pollutants: carbon monoxide, particle pollution and radioactivity. The carbon monoxide detecting sweaters change color when the pollutant is detected and return to its normal state when the toxin is no longer in the environment.

The last wearable is a reactive radioactivity shirt uses another smart dye that changes color in response to gamma or electron beam radiation. Via Core77. Google Glass Is Dead; Long Live Smart Glasses. Editor’s note: Google announced on Thursday that it will stop selling the current version of Google Glass, a much-derided device that was available through a public beta program, and will work on future iterations of the product in secret.

Google Glass Is Dead; Long Live Smart Glasses

Our senior editor for mobile technology, Rachel Metz, wrote in our January/February issue about what Google Glass’s struggles mean for wearable tech going forward. Two and a half years after ­Sergey Brin unveiled Google Glass with a group of skydivers jumping from a zeppelin above San Francisco, the computer you wear on your face is falling to its death. It’s still not a finished consumer product. It’s not even close to being something people yearn for, at least not beyond the Glass Explorers who each paid $1,500 for early access. Although Google says it’s still committed to Glass, several companies, including Twitter, have stopped working on apps for it. Snapchat launches video-capture sunglasses. Undeterred by the failure of Google Glass, Snapchat has decided to launch its own pair of glasses that can record video.

Snapchat launches video-capture sunglasses

The picture and video messaging app is expected to release its Spectacles sunglasses in the US in time for Christmas, priced at about $130 (£100). The glasses can record 10-second clips that can be sent via Bluetooth to smartphones. The camera has a wider lens than typical smartphones, with a 115 degree angle, and records circular video that is more akin to human vision. Artist Created This 3D Printed Swimsuit. Iris van Herpen. SEIJAKU- July 2016, Paris Haute Couture Week For “Seijaku”, the Couture collection presented in Paris on July 4th, 2016 Iris van Herpen explores the study of cymatics, which visualizes sound waves as evolving geometric patterns.

Iris van Herpen

In cymatics, the higher the frequency of the sound wave, the more complex the visible patterns. Sustainable material pioneers: what does the future hold? What’s wrong with the materials I’m wearing now?

Sustainable material pioneers: what does the future hold?

It’s likely that you’re wearing cotton or polyester, two of the fashion industry’s most popular fibres. Cotton depends on large amounts of water to grow, and polyester depends on now-declining reserves of oil and gas. The idea behind sustainable materials is that they are less damaging to the environment to produce, consuming fewer natural resources and creating less pollution. How Will The Fashion Industry Be Affected by Trump's Win? The stock market has been on a wild ride since the world collectively began to realize that Donald Trump would be the next President of the United States of America, and that uncertainty will also have an affect on the fashion industry.

How Will The Fashion Industry Be Affected by Trump's Win?

Of course, everything right now is mostly speculation, since Trump won’t assume office until January, but Fashionista has put together a handy summary of some of the current effects and what might come next. According to analysts, there could be “negative consequences for luxury” and possible “positive ones for accessible fashion,” but the fact that Trump has a distinct lack of actual policy detail makes it hard to judge. If Trump is committed to his anti-globalist viewpoint (and who knows with that guy), then it could mean higher taxes on foreign goods, which could hurt international brands.

On the other hand, if he does in fact lower taxes on the wealthy, that extra spending money could mean an increase in sales for high-end luxury brands. The hoodies challenging America’s broken voting system. Artist Brendan Fowler’s latest project Election Reform may contain the ‘E’ word, but it’s not about Clinton vs Trump – it’s not even about the current presidential campaigns.

The hoodies challenging America’s broken voting system

Those embroidered ‘Election Reform!’ 'Genderless' fashion rocks the luxury sector - News : Industry (#726517) Gender fluid, genderless, no gender, transgender, non-gendered, unisex: all words to define a relatively new concept that is sweeping the fashion sector.

'Genderless' fashion rocks the luxury sector - News : Industry (#726517)

From unisex collections to mixed men's and women's fashion shows, the luxury industry is experiencing a revolution. Why 'seasonless' dressing is this year's 'normcore' Raey.

Why 'seasonless' dressing is this year's 'normcore'

The hoodies challenging America’s broken voting system. How this election jolted fashion into action. Never in recent years has an election been quite as polarising as the one that culminates today, and fashion – usually one industry that tends to keep out of explicitly political affairs, save for past Obama-rallying – has not been exempt from its whirlwind.

How this election jolted fashion into action

From social media campaigns to all-out endorsements, the New York Times’ Vanessa Friedman said it best when she declared that “The campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Donald J. Trump have galvanised the industry to an extent never before seen.” In short: this election has struck a chord. Vogue magazine, the quintessential American fashion bible, led the way by endorsing Hillary Clinton back in October, a first for the 124-year-old publication.

Top 60 Editorial Trends in October. 45 Political Marketing Stunts. Consumers Want Experiences, Not Things. In their endless quest to decode millennial behavior, marketers have placed a microscope on millennials' spending habits, hoping to glean patterns for how their behavior differs from previous generations. Sorry Not Sorry, but Fashion Won't Be Truly Genderless Until More Men Wear Skirts. Between its tiny models, outrageous price tags and mind-boggling designs (hello, Hannibal Lecter masks), fashion isn't always the most inclusive of worlds. But recently the industry has been celebrating a shift to greater inclusivity when it comes to gender, with designers sending men and women down the runway in identical outfits and retailers ending the divide between men's and women's sections.

Unisex fashion — also referred to as ungendered, agender, genderless and gender neutral style — has created huge buzz over the past few seasons, with Gucci announcing plans to show its men's and women's apparel in one show, London department store Selfridges hosting a unisex fashion pop-up and high street giant Zara launching a line of ungendered basics. Burberry teases its first 'seasonless' fashion shows in latest campaign. Sorry Not Sorry, but Fashion Won't Be Truly Genderless Until More Men Wear Skirts. Burberry's seasonless clothes usher in fashion's stream-of-consciousness era. When Virginia Woolf wrote the fantastical biographical novel Orlando, she broke all the rules of time and gender. The protagonist lives for four centuries but ages just 36 years; halfway through, with no explanation, he switches from being a man to a woman. The Consumer Shift: Tom Ford Joins In as Debate Rages – WWD.

How Burberry is Operationalising 'See Now, Buy Now'. LONDON, United Kingdom — Burberry will unveil its first ever “see now, buy now” show at London Fashion Week on Monday, heralding a new era for the industry in which fans can get their hands on "seasonless" items immediately after they are presented on the runway. But the new approach has significant implications for production and supply chains, which were out of sync with communications and marketing departments, and all eyes remain on the brand to see how it has executed the changes needed to adapt towards a fashion immediacy model.

When the company announced its new consumer-facing concept in February, it was held up as a solution to long-standing problems with the traditional fashion calendar. Fashion shows had long been strictly industry events for press and buyers to preview collections. The innovative concept ignited a new chapter for the global fashion industry. If any brand can make it work though, it is Burberry.

Designing. Digital pioneer Burberry does it again, this time radicalising its whole fashion calendar. Tom Ford & Vetements’ seasonless fashion: Big change or same old same old? - Fashion & Mash. A few months ago the CFDA was discussing possible plans to turn New York Fashion Week into a more in-season, consumer-focused event on the back of the social media/live streaming revolution. SWOT analysis of Burberry - Burberry SWOT analysis.

Strengths in the SWOT analysis of Burberry. Burberry and ASOS expecting sales boost from tumbling pound. Marta Represa reports on the Vetements show - Vetements @ Paris Haute Couture A/W 16. Tom Ford & Vetements’ seasonless fashion: Big change or same old same old? - Fashion & Mash. Li Edelkoort publishes manifesto on why "fashion is obsolete" Haute Couture fact file. Get clued up about the lavish world of couture as spring/summer 2015 Paris Haute Couture Fashion Week gets underway. Couture in the Age of Fast Fashion: Will It Survive? Each season, Couture Fashion Week passes with little fanfare. Unlike seasonal fashion weeks which often feature 20 or so shows in a single day, the Couture Fashion Week schedule is minimal and uncluttered. Is the Customer Always Right?

LONDON, United Kingdom — When talking about the digital world, fashion designers and business leaders often mention the “direct conversation” the internet enables them to have with consumers — the instant feedback they get on every image or product they publish online. Now, some companies are using this direct line to their customers to ask: what do you want to buy? Fashion’s Fourth Industrial Revolution. Luxury Makers’ Dubious Dividends Make Them Target for Shorts. Dolce & Gabbana’s Local Retail Revolution. Under Armour Hits the Runway With High Fashion Aim. With Shoppable Runway Shows, Fashion Brands Court Millennials. Cartier’s $600,000 Watch Shows Risks of Extending Luxury Brands.

As Brexit Looms, Prime Minister Theresa May Looks to the Future of British Fashion. Online Retailers Thwarted by Manufacturers’ Curbs, EU Says. UK inflation rate holds steady at 0.6% Meet the future stars of sustainable fashion. LCF Students Prove Sustainability Will Soon Be A Staple London Fashion Week Trend.