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Detroit Research Paper (Econ/English)

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Detroit budget cuts firefighter pay by 10% Detroit police feel pain of city's financial collapse. Feb 23, 2014.

Detroit police feel pain of city's financial collapse

Detroit to get $21 million more for blight demolition. WASHINGTON — The City of Detroit stands to receive an additional $21.25 million in demolition money from the federal government under a proposal authorized by the Obama administration and approved Wednesday by a state housing board.

Detroit to get $21 million more for blight demolition

The money will be enough to take down nearly 1,300 blighted structures if recent averages hold. Vacant and Abandoned Properties: Turning Liabilities Into Assets. The absence of universal definitions of vacancy and abandonment complicates efforts to assess the number of vacant and abandoned properties nationally.Vacant and abandoned properties are linked to increased rates of crime (particularly arson) and declining property values.

Vacant and Abandoned Properties: Turning Liabilities Into Assets

The maintenance or demolition of vacant properties is a huge expense for many cities.It is critical to match strategies for combating vacancy to neighborhood market conditions. Vacant lots can be greened and repurposed for new uses, such as this play area in Pittsburgh’s East Liberty neighborhood. Photo courtesy: Sara InnamoratoDerelict houses, dormant factories, moribund strip malls, and other types of vacant and abandoned properties are among the most visible outward signs of a community’s reversing fortunes.

Properties that have turned from productive use to disuse are found in cities, suburbs, and rural areas throughout the country, and they vary widely in size, shape, and former use. Volume of abandoned homes 'absolutely terrifying'. Detroit — Detroit has had more homes foreclosed in the past 10 years than the total number of houses in several suburbs — or all of Buffalo, New York.

Volume of abandoned homes 'absolutely terrifying'

Since 2005, more than 1-in-3 Detroit properties — 139,699 of 384,672 — have been foreclosed because of mortgage defaults or unpaid taxes, property records show. Volume of abandoned homes 'absolutely terrifying' Detroit pays high price for arson onslaught. Detroit — Arson is a raging epidemic in Detroit, destroying neighborhoods and lives as the city tries to emerge from bankruptcy.

Detroit pays high price for arson onslaught

Even amid a historic demolition blitz, buildings burn faster than Detroit can raze them. Last year, the city had 3,839 suspicious fires and demolished 3,500 buildings, according to city records analyzed by The Detroit News. Pay cuts coming to Detroit police, fire officers - Aug. 2, 2013. The 10% cuts apply to 1,200 police lieutenants and sergeants and 400 comparable officers in the fire department.

Pay cuts coming to Detroit police, fire officers - Aug. 2, 2013

The cuts, announced this week, will take effect in September. Bill Nowling, spokesman for Kevyn Orr, the emergency manager overseeing the city's reorganization effort, said other city employees took the same 10% cut in 2012. The cuts for these officers was delayed because of union contracts that were in effect. "We had to make this cut due to disparity between management and rank and file," said Nowling. Detroit firefighters protesting bankruptcy discuss expanding fight against pension and budget cuts. By our reporters 25 July 2013.

Detroit firefighters protesting bankruptcy discuss expanding fight against pension and budget cuts

Detroit is going dark - Jul. 19, 2013. And if you're walking around the city, it might make sense to bring a flashlight -- about 40% of the 88,000 street lights don't work.

Detroit is going dark - Jul. 19, 2013

Those are two of the problems highlighted by Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder as he approved a bankruptcy filing for the state's biggest city. The problems have fed on themselves, resulting in 78.000 buildings either abandoned or ruined. Detroit plans to sell off closed fire stations. By Bryan Dyne 5 June 2013 Eight vacant buildings once operated by the Detroit Fire Department─seven fire stations and the former firehouse headquarters─are being sold by the city of Detroit to private investors and developers to be transformed into restaurants, wineries or micro-distilleries in an effort to raise money for the city.

Detroit plans to sell off closed fire stations

The minimum bid for the fire stations are $637,000 while the former headquarters is being sold for $1.25 million. It is not yet clear who has bought the fire stations or for what price, though it is known that Southfield, Michigan developer Walter Cohen has plans to purchase the former headquarters and turn it into a boutique hotel. Suspicious fires plague Detroit's popular Heidelberg Project. The latest in a string of suspicious fires early Thursday destroyed a home in Detroit's internationally known Heidelberg Project, an installation that transformed decaying homes into works of art.

Suspicious fires plague Detroit's popular Heidelberg Project

The blaze engulfed "The Penny House," a small home adorned with images of pennies, around 3 a.m., fire officials said. The two-story structure was leveled by the time firefighters arrived. 9 ways Detroit is changing after bankruptcy. When Detroit filed for bankruptcy last July, observers around the world were shocked by how far some city services had deteriorated -- though it was no secret to residents. Average police response times clocked in at almost an hour. Tens of thousands of broken streetlights meant entire streets go dark at nightfall.

How to shrink a city. ONE of the biggest challenges for the world this century is how to accommodate the hundreds of millions of people who will flock to cities, especially in emerging economies. Coping with this human torrent will be fearsomely difficult—but at least the problem is widely acknowledged. That is not true of another pressing urban dilemma: what to do with cities that are losing people. They are hardly unusual. Almost one in ten American cities is shrinking.