Catching Up (9.20)

Facebook Twitter

The Ruins of Dead Social Networks - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic (Build 20110920042010) It was about 20 years ago that I first discovered what a telephone line and a computer could do when they came together.

The Ruins of Dead Social Networks - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic (Build 20110920042010)

Is Printing A Gun The Same As Buying A Gun? There’s an interesting back-and-forth going on at Thingiverse, a site founded by Makerbot to share 3D projects.

Is Printing A Gun The Same As Buying A Gun?

Two designers have made two parts for the AR-15 rifle platform. The first part is a standard rifle magazine complete with spring but the second part is AR-15 lower receiver. Al Jazeera Chief Steps Down, WikiLeaks Cables a Culprit? - TVNewser (Build 20110920042010) $1,279-per-hour, 30,000-core cluster built on Amazon EC2 cloud (Build 20110920042010) Amazon EC2 and other cloud services are expanding the market for high-performance computing.

$1,279-per-hour, 30,000-core cluster built on Amazon EC2 cloud (Build 20110920042010)

Without access to a national lab or a supercomputer in your own data center, cloud computing lets businesses spin up temporary clusters at will and stop paying for them as soon as the computing needs are met. A vendor called Cycle Computing is on a mission to demonstrate the potential of Amazon’s cloud by building increasingly large clusters on the Elastic Compute Cloud. Even with Amazon, building a cluster takes some work, but Cycle combines several technologies to ease the process and recently used them to create a 30,000-core cluster running CentOS Linux. The cluster, announced publicly this week, was created for an unnamed “Top 5 Pharma” customer, and ran for about seven hours at the end of July at a peak cost of $1,279 per hour, including the fees to Amazon and Cycle Computing.

Amazon offers its own special cluster compute instances, at a higher cost than regular-sized virtual machines. Study: patent trolls have cost innovators half a trillion dollars (Build 20110920042010) By now, the story of patent trolls has become well-known: a small company with no products of its own threatens lawsuits against larger companies who inadvertently infringe its portfolio of broad patents.

Study: patent trolls have cost innovators half a trillion dollars (Build 20110920042010)

The scenario has become so common that we don't even try to cover all the cases here at Ars. If we did, we'd have little time to write about much else. But anecdotal evidence is one thing. Data is another. Three Boston University researchers have produced a rigorous empirical estimate of the cost of patent trolling. Two of the study's authors, James Bessen and Mike Meurer, wrote Patent Failure, an empirical study of the patent system that has been widely read and cited since its publication in 2008. Stock market events It's hard to measure the costs of litigation directly.

The trio use a clever method known as a stock market event study to estimate these costs. America: Land of the Slow - NYTimes.com (Build 20110920042010) 4:47 p.m. | Updated to clarify that the rankings in the report were condensed.

America: Land of the Slow - NYTimes.com (Build 20110920042010)

Internet speeds in the United States have long trailed those in other countries like South Korea. Downloading videos, games and other big files often takes far longer for Americans than their counterparts across the globe. In the latest global rankings, the United States remained a slow-poke, placing No. 26 in terms of speediest Internet connections, according to Pando Networks, a company that delivers games and other large online files online for other companies.

South Korea led the list followed by Romania and Bulgaria. (The rankings published in the report omit some countries. “The U.S., as whole, is slower than many people think,” said Robert Levitan, chief executive of Pando Networks. Average Internet downloads in South Korea of 2,202 kilobytes per second were nearly four times faster than the 616 KBps in the United States, the report found. Algiers led the rankings of the 12 slowest cities. Google+: 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99... 100. (Build 20110920042010) For our international readers, this post is also available in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish (Latin America, Spain). - Ed.

Google+: 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99... 100. (Build 20110920042010)

Google+ Suddenly Looks Pretty Busy For A Ghost Town. Google+ is opening up.

Google+ Suddenly Looks Pretty Busy For A Ghost Town

The service that the enthusiastic and curious once begged to join is now open to anyone with a Google account, except those unfortunate Apps users (what’s up with that?). Users new and old also get to play with plenty of new desktop and mobile toys to remind them what was exciting about G+ in the first place. New APIs even let developers in on the fun. Poker Site Misused Players’ Money, U.S. Says - NYTimes.com (Build 20110920042010) How Stormpulse made more money on fewer customers. Kindle library ebook lending goes beta, at least for Seattle residents. How technology is changing business [Infographic] — Tech News and Analysis (Build 20110920042010) Updated.

How technology is changing business [Infographic] — Tech News and Analysis (Build 20110920042010)

The society as we know it is going through a radical makeover, thanks to constant connectivity everywhere. This is creating a need for a digital makeover of everything – from retail to our postal system. It is changing our infrastructure needs and it is also increasing the velocity of business. The Economist Intelligence Unit have Progress Software has crafted an infographic that captures this change based on research from the Economist Intelligence Unit.